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Check my math, vmware hard drive sizes

Posted on 2014-09-25
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Last Modified: 2014-10-06
I am following this EE guide:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/VMWare/A_12938-HOW-TO-Shrink-a-VMware-Virtual-Machine-Disk-VMDK-in-15-minutes.html

The goal is to permanently shrink/trim some thinly provisioned vmdk files to free space on the datastores

The overall process is defrag, shrink via disk management in windows, edit the vmdk file, migrate the vm and migrate it back

I've done this on a test server and it worked great, but for this production one (have good backups) i just want to make absolutely sure i edit the vmdk with the correct numbers (so as to not truncate live data)

i've already shrunk the ntfs volume from something like 796gb down to 350gb and see unallocated space, so i know for sure the end of the disk is ok to chop off.

system reserved: 100mb (capacity 104,853,504 (99.9mb))
    (29,491,200 (28.1mb) used, 75,362,304 (71.8mb) free)
C: = 341.80gb  (capacity = 367,001,595,904) which windows reports as 341gb
    (131,696,746,496 used (122gb), 235,304,849,408 (219gb) free)
unallocated:  438.10gb (448619mb)

in the vmdk file, the drive is defined as size:  1635778560  (approximately 780gb)

Based on the linked article above, the way i calculate the new value should be: 734003200 (350gb)

Is that correct, and can you demonstrate that it is so?
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Question by:FocIS
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2 Comments
 
LVL 123
ID: 40345164
Its late here in the UK, I'll run the numbers in the morning or you....
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Accepted Solution

by:
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 2000 total points
ID: 40363407
Sorry, I missed this question so just returning to it....

okay you values are correct, you have posted

e.g.

 1635778560 (approximately 780gb)

Size = 780GB x (1024)^3   = 837518622720

837518622720 / 512

= 1635778560 CORRECT

734003200 (350gb)

Size = 350GB x (1024)^3  = 375809638400

375809638400 / 512

= 734003200 CORRECT

Your published figures in your post, agree with my calculations.
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