Destroy Failover cluster Windows 2008 R2

I have a failover cluster running Windows Server 2008 R2 with an iSCSI target attached directly to the servers.  We are going to move this infrastructure to a virtual environment, but I first need to break/destroy the cluster.  

There are two servers in the cluster.  I would like completely remove the cluster from the network and take the second server offline.  I've found a lot of documentation out there about destroying the cluster, evicting nodes, etc, but can't get a good feeling on the best way to approach this.

The servers have two NIC ports in them.  Port 1 on both servers have static IPs assigned to the Local LAN and are plugged into the switches.  Port 2 on both servers is plugged into a storage server.  These ports have a separate subnet from the LAN and utilize the storage server as an iSCSI target.

My main question and concern is if I choose the option in Failover Cluster Manger to "Destroy Cluster" will that completely remove the cluster AND the iSCSI target containing the data?  Ideally I would like to detroy the cluster and disjoin the second server from the domain.
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jplagensAsked:
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TropicalBoundCommented:
It sounds like there is data on the cluster that you need to access during this transition.  Correct?

Move all the cluster resources to one host, making it the active node.  Remove the passive node from the cluster making it a stand alone server.  Prepare the stand alone server for the data that needs to be accessed.  Once the stand alone server is functioning properly, the cluster should no longer be in use and can be destroyed without fear of losing data or production time.
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jplagensAuthor Commented:
Sorry for the long delay.  We are only onsite every other week at this location.  When you say "remove the passive node", do you mean to evict the node?

The main server is currently the active node.  The quorum and iSCSI share is sitting on the main server.
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TropicalBoundCommented:
Correct.  Evict the passive node.  This will allow you to make whatever changes are necessary to this server without affecting production.
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Windows Server 2008

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