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moving multiple vmware virtual disks

Posted on 2014-09-29
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Last Modified: 2014-12-11
I have multiple disks in VMware which are configures as follows
I have a 750 GB disk
a 100 GB disk and a 300 GB disk
In windows server 2003 these disks are all one drive letter that had been extended over time.
Meaning in disk management 3 disks are listed and they are all the D: drive which spans each disk.

I now want to access the D: drive from another virtual Guest.

I want to shutdown the first guest and then connect the 3 Virtual disks to the new Virtual Guest and when I power up the new guest I want to be able to access all the files which were on my first Virtual guest 2003 server OS d: drive.

Please let me know any solutions that are available.

I'm running VMware 5.1


THanks
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Question by:Ekuskowski
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Carlos Ijalba earned 250 total points
ID: 40350076
It's probably a good time to use VMware Converter and clone that VM to a new one, consolidating the 3 disks into 1.

Basically you'll be copying the whole VM, not detaching the disks and reattaching.

You can also use a disk partition backup utility to do a backup and a restore of the drive (DriveSnapshot, EASEUS, etc).

You would have to do a backup of that vHD anyway, since if you want to try fiddling with the drive between VMs, you better play it safe and have a backup just in case. If you do the backup using VSS or other block copy technologies it will be FAST, and you can do it without downtime.
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Could you upload a screenshot, so I can have a look at disk management.

So you have a three virtual disks (vmdks) which make up this OS disk ?
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by:Ekuskowski
ID: 40350210
Andrew -  I've uploaded two screenshots - Disk management the other of VMware. the OS is installed on a small 15 GB drive
Carlos - I think you are correct, can I run the VMware Converter on a live VM ?  I have VEEAM as my backup, would I be able to leverage Veeam to consolidate the disks ?
Computer-Management.JPG
Vmware.JPG
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by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 250 total points
ID: 40350224
You've got three options:-

1. Use a disk cloning tool, e.g. Drive Snapshot or Conezilla, to CLONE the D: drive to a new virtual disk of the correct size, in the OS. So add new virutal disk of correct size 100/750/300GB, and then clone D: to F:

remove the F: drive and present to the new VM.

2. Present the existing virtual disks in the correct order to the new VM (I would not do this!)

3. VMware Converter could be used to create a V2V, and give you a new VM, with  true C: D: E:

HOW TO: FAQ VMware P2V Troubleshooting

HOW TO:  P2V, V2V for FREE - VMware vCenter Converter Standalone 5.5
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by:Carlos Ijalba
ID: 40351079
Ekuskowski,

You can convert live VMs, in fact that's the whole point, you install converter on a PC or another VM and then convert via the network. And it's probably the best option, plus you get to learn to use converter for the future!

It's handy to convert physical to virtual, but also used nowadays to reduce the size of HD's until a better way comes through.
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You cannot use Veeam Backup to consdolidate your D: drive, but you can use Windows Backup....

Backup your D: drive, create a new F: virtual disk of the correct size, and then restore files to F:

remove the D: drive, change the letter of F: and your done.
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