CHKDSK during restart followed by "Windows has encountered a critical problem…"

Hello,

Earlier today I did a routine restart of my computer. However, during the black & white phase (before windows), CHKDSK was triggered for some reason and ran for a couple of minutes before returning to the regular startup process.

I do not recall the specific wording which was displayed during CHKDSK, but I believe the following were included as it began:

    • a reference to Drive C,
    • the letters NTFS,
    • and the word "consistency"

It then went through a 3-4 stages after which the remaining startup and Windows launch processes seemed to proceed as they usually do. After logging in, I didn't think much more about it until 5-10 minutes later when the following alert appeared:
Windows alert
Now I'm a couple of hours out from that 2nd restart and have not noticed any further problems.

Questions:

1) When CHKDSK runs, does it create a log or any type of record which can be accessed after-the-fact to determine what may have been the instigator and what steps were taken, if any, to fix the problem?

2) Is there any way to know:  

    a] whether this was some type of transient hiccup which is now resolved or

    b] if it is an indicator of something more sinister which could manifest itself at some later point — but with more deleterious results?

3) As it is, what is the best way to proceed?

Thanks
WeThotUWasAToadAsked:
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Gabriel CliftonNet AdminCommented:
Your chkdsk log is located here: Open Event view --> Windows Logs --> Application, sort by Source --> Winlogon.

Depending on what you find there will determine the severity.
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dbruntonCommented:
>>  As it is, what is the best way to proceed?

Make sure all data is backed up off this disk (documents, email, bookmarks, music, serial numbers, install files, etc, etc)
Make sure all install media is available.

Determine which manufacturer made the hard disk in your system and download the test util from them.

Example links - not necessarily comprehensive

http://www.seagate.com/support/downloads/seatools/
http://support.wdc.com/product/download.asp?groupid=810&sid=3&lang=en

Run the util on your disk and determine its health.  The test as well as the chkdsk log will give you an idea of what you may have to do.
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WeThotUWasAToadAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the responses.
Open Event view --> Windows Logs --> Application, sort by Source --> Winlogo
Is this the right place to be?
Fig. 2I sorted by Source but for some reason, as can be seen, the dates are all over the place.

After filtering for "past 24 hours" I got this:
Fig. 3which for "Winlogon", showed only two Event ID's for today: #4101 which is something like, "Windows certificate verification", and #6000, as shown.

While there, I noticed a Windows Error source:
Fig. 4I also tried sorting by Date & Time and noticed a long string of red exclamation buttons in the Level column. About a dozen of them had the Source, QuickBooks:
Fig. 5but several pages worth of errors were for a source, VSS (Volume Shadow Copy Service) which I've never heard of:
Fig. 6
These sources and details don't really tell me much but can you see anything which might suggest a problem?

Thanks
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dbruntonCommented:
For Windows XP it is under Winlogon.  

For Windows 7 it is under Event Viewer -> Windows Logs -> Application -> Wininit

You are in the right place and doing the right filtering.
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WeThotUWasAToadAuthor Commented:
Determine which manufacturer made the hard disk in your system and download the test util from them.
In case it's helpful, here is part of a Belarc profile I obtained just now (which you will probably have to click to see):
Fig. 7Googling the C drive (MKNSSDCR480GB-7 [Hard drive]) shows the manufacturer to be Mushkin. However, searches for entries such as:

    "Mushkin test utility MKNSSDCR480GB-7 [Hard drive]"

brought up only a slew of retail sites.

Do you have any suggestions on how to obtain the test utility you mentioned?

Thanks
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WeThotUWasAToadAuthor Commented:
You are in the right place and doing the right filtering.
OK, great.

Were you able to see enough in my screenshots to rule out a problem that would show up in the log?

FYI, I'm happy to report that after two more restarts and using my system for most of the past 9 hours or so since the initial problem, there has been no indication of continued issues.
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nobusCommented:
i found that a second  chkdsk run often helps.
can you boot into safe mode?
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dbruntonCommented:
Mushkin is a solid state drive and not the spinning ones.

Let's see, for reference purposes you've got a Mushkin SSD 480 Gb, drive C:
Hitachi 1000 Gb, drive F:
Seagate 3000 Gb, drive G:
Western Digital 500 Gb, drive E:

The last three are probably spinning ones.  Now I can't find anything on Mushkin's site for testing the SSD and I can't really recommend anything out there.  SSD's are a whole new ball game to me.  You don't test them like hard disks.

Have a look under Event Viewer -> Windows Logs -> Application -> Wininit (you may need to do filtering and see if anything pops up around the date/time concerned).

nobus has suggested running chkdsk again and that is a good idea.  Let's see if anything else surfaces.  Also do it on your other disks.

Now the Volume Shadow Copy Service is described here http://blog.szynalski.com/2009/11/23/volume-shadow-copy-system-restore/  Looks like it was conflicting with another application while it was doing its stuff.

Have a read here http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-performance/windows-7-vss-error-12294/7c645caf-6d6a-4045-b9a0-a5829d8f6971 and the recommendation was to run System File Checker and check the OS is OK.

Quick Books also had problems but that Event ID isn't giving enough information.
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WeThotUWasAToadAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the additional comments.

FYI, I've had no further recurrences of the problems.

i found that a second  chkdsk run often helps.
can you boot into safe mode?
It's been quite a while but as I remember, Safe Mode is accessed by tapping some key or other during the BIOS portion of booting up. Doing so takes you to a BIOS menu which includes the option to start in Safe Mode

Is that correct?

If so, which key should be tapped?

Is there a better way to do it?

Should the system be in Safe Mode when running CHKDSK?

Mushkin is a solid state drive and not the spinning ones.
Yes, that is correct. My system was built by my nephew so, trusting him completely, I did not pay much attention to specific manufacturers. However, I do know that the C drive is a 500 GB solid-state drive (SSD).

nobus has suggested running chkdsk again and that is a good idea.  Let's see if anything else surfaces.  Also do it on your other disks.
How does one run or launch CHKDSK?

Also, I assume by your suggestion, that in the process of beginning CHKDSK, it can be directed at any of the individual hard drives.

Is that correct?

Thanks a bunch.
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dbruntonCommented:
For Safe Mode press the F8 key before the splash screen

Doesn't have to be in Safe mode but see comment further down.

Various ways of doing it.

http://www.thewindowsclub.com/command-line-check-disk-windows-7
shows the graphical method and the command line


http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/ee872425.aspx
shows the command line

Now running it in safe mode means you don't have anything else running at the same time and interfering.

From the command line do

chkdsk c: to get a report on the drive.  Won't fix anything but will tell you what it finds.

Replace c: with e: f: g: for your other drives.
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nobusCommented:
or just right click the disk drive in Explorer, select properties and scan disk for problems
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WeThotUWasAToadAuthor Commented:
Thanks
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