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Free software that will detect and give the ip of devices connected to a switch?

Posted on 2014-09-30
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Last Modified: 2014-10-09
Hello Experts,

I need a piece of software, hopefully free, that I can run on my laptop which is connected to a poe switch and the only other device connected to the switch is an ip camera.  I can't for the life of me figure out what the ip address of the camera is.  I don't want software similar to "Angry IP Scanner" as you are required to enter an ip scope that you wish to scan and I have no idea what ip address it even is.  I need software that will detect* devices that are connected to the same switch that my laptop is connected to and provide the ip address of found device(s).
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Question by:Brent Johnson
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LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Emmanuel Adebayo
ID: 40352618
Hi,

You can use "Advanced IP Scanner", this tool is free and it will detect all the devices connected together on your network

Download the tool at http://www.advanced-ip-scanner.com/
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Author Comment

by:Brent Johnson
ID: 40352630
Emmanuel Adebayo - I just downloaded that tool that you suggested, but still even with this tool, the device on the network has to be a "192.168.x.x" address or another that you have to manually specify.  I have no idea what the ip address of the camera is... so I need software that you don't have to specify an address pool and that it will just automatically detect the device and tell me what the ip address is.  

For all I know, the camera's ip address could be "169.254.x.x" but I have no idea... you know what I mean?
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LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:Joshua Grantom
ID: 40352647
Hey Brent,

If its a static address that you cannot figure out, you need to reset the camera.


Also, I would make sure there is a router connected to the switch as well. If there is no router and the camera is using DHCP, it will not get an address anyway
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Expert Comment

by:Emmanuel Adebayo
ID: 40352651
I see.

You can download the one from spiceworks from the link below, it will scan all the devices and give you the report with IP etc. It is free but registration is requires.

http://www.spiceworks.com/free-pc-network-inventory-software/
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LVL 53

Expert Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE
ID: 40352658
Hi Brent,
Your router should show you the IP address of everything connected to it. Just log into its Admin screen (probably 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1 or something like that — do an IPCONFIG in a command prompt to get the address — it should show as the Default Gateway). I trust you know the router's password — if not, download the manual for it, see what the default Admin password is, log in, and change the password! Then look for a section that shows the connected devices. It should display the IP Address, MAC Address, and Name of all devices. Regards, Joe
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Author Comment

by:Brent Johnson
ID: 40352698
Unfortunately, it isn't connected to a router.  It's a wireless ip camera that is just going to a single poe switch for power, but there is no uplink to the switch.  The switch is being used only for power for the camera because the poe injector that came with the camera is bad.
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Accepted Solution

by:
Fred Marshall earned 250 total points
ID: 40352711
Here is the best you can do:

1) Determine the laptop IP address and subnet mask.  Run command prompt command: ipconfig
2) Using the IP address and subnet of the laptop, enter them in the spaces provided at:
http://www.subnet-calculator.com/subnet.php?net_class=C
The range of IP addresses will show up under "Host Address Range".
3) Enter the range in your preferred tool to scan all the IP addresses that are "alive" on the network and that return pings.
4) Run command prompt command:
arp -a
This will give you a list of active IP addresses with their MAC addresses.
The first part of the MAC addresses tells you the manufacturer - which will likely help (but may not).
5) Once you have the list of active IP addresses and the usual suspects, run command prompt command:
nbtstat -a [ipaddress]
this MAY tell you the name of the device at that address.  A camera may not.

With these tools you might narrow down the camera by process of elimination.
Of course, the opposite approach is to identify which addresses have names and eliminate those first.

You didn't say if the switch was a managed switch or not.
One way or another a switch might provide you with PORT/MAC address information.
So, if you know the port the camera is plugged into the switch, even if it's shared with other devices through another switch, you can get the list of MAC addresses for each port.
Then you can use
arp -a
to match the MAC address with the IP address.

Using this same idea, you might plug the camera cable into a managed switch port so you can get the information this way ... if the current switch won't do it.
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LVL 53

Assisted Solution

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE
Joe Winograd, EE MVE earned 250 total points
ID: 40352715
If it's not connected to a router, how is an IP address getting assigned? All of my IP cameras are connected to a switch, but the switch is connected to a router that has the DHCP server. Otherwise, how can you utilize the camera? Seems to me that, ultimately, it has to be connected to a router somewhere in the network.
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LVL 26

Expert Comment

by:Fred Marshall
ID: 40352792
I'm not sure that knowing how the IP address is *assigned* (it may be static) is going to help.  
But yes, if the IP address is being assigned via DHCP then there will be a list of leases that indicate the device MAC address.
So, similar to the above, if you know the MAC address of the camera then this or arp -a will help.
The camera may have the MAC address marked on the outside.
If not, then you could do this:

Disconnect the camera network cable.
Connect the camera network connection to a laptop that's statically set up on the same subnet.
Then run the ping scan.
There should be but a single reply .. from the camera.
Either the scan will tell you the camera MAC address or an
arp -a
will give it to you.
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LVL 53

Expert Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE
ID: 40352912
I agree — it doesn't matter how the IP is assigned, as long as it is! My IP cameras are all on a switch and all have static IP addresses assigned by the router (I find it a lot easier to deal with them when each has a static IP).
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LVL 26

Expert Comment

by:Fred Marshall
ID: 40353109
Yes.  I agree too.  If static IP addresses aren't entered into a device manually or with perhaps a script then static IP addresses can assigned by a router *using the DHCP process* using reserved IP addresses being assigned to the respective device MAC addresses as a manual entry into the router.  So, if you already have that then it may be another way to sort things out.
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Author Closing Comment

by:Brent Johnson
ID: 40371375
Thanks guys.  I've determined that either the camera is bad or the ethernet cable end that plugs into the camera may have to be re-done.  I went to another building with the same setup as this one, and as soon as I plugged my laptop into the other side of the injector, the camera instantly popped up with it's IP address leading me to believe what I just mentioned.  Thanks for all your help.
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LVL 53

Expert Comment

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE
ID: 40371516
You're welcome, Brent. And thanks to you for letting us know the status with that final post. Even though it's not a certainty this time, it never ceases to amaze me how often a bad cable is the culprit. Regards, Joe
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