What does this combobox breakdown mean exactly?

Why the 2 red "X"'s?
BlakeMcKennaAsked:
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käµfm³d 👽Connect With a Mentor Commented:
Item is considered to be a default property. If you've ever worked in C#, it's the equivalent of being able to index the object (like an array)--i.e. grab some data by index number (or name). Default properties take a parameter that specifies the index you would like to pull data by. The error you see is simply Visual Studio telling you that it cannot display a value for the property because that property takes a parameter that Visual Studio cannot supply. You could alternatively open up the Watch window and enter something like:

Item(0)

...to see the value at index 0. Default properties can also be indexed by string. It depends on the object as to which method (or methods) are implemented.
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David L. HansenProgrammer AnalystCommented:
Would you mind posting a picture or giving us a little more detail to help us understand your question?
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BlakeMcKennaAuthor Commented:
Sorry...my bad!
Screenshot.jpg
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David L. HansenConnect With a Mentor Programmer AnalystCommented:
Ahh yes, the red X's symbolize items which are defined but are either out-of-scope or have not yet been instantiated.  In your case the X's are referring to the items already selected by the user.  If the user has not selected any items in the combobox then that property is essentially empty.
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käµfm³d 👽Connect With a Mentor Commented:
@sl8rz

You can see just above that the SelectedIndex is equal to 8, so the user (or the program) must have selected something.

I don't think your assessment is accurate. If we were talking about the Watch window, then I would agree. Because this is the popup that you get when you mouse over a variable, everything visible should be in scope.
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BlakeMcKennaAuthor Commented:
Thanks guys!
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David L. HansenProgrammer AnalystCommented:
Kaufmed,

True, the combobox is certainly in-scope. If memory serves: when a group of custom-defined generics are placed in the combobox, and one is selected, data is shown in the selectedItem property.  In this situation there just isn't any indexable data inside the selectedItem...correct?
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käµfm³d 👽Commented:
@sl8rz

In this situation there just isn't any indexable data inside the selectedItem...correct?
It's as I mentioned above:  The DataRowView, which in this scenario is what the SelectedItem is, has two default properties:

DataRowView.Item Property (Int32)
DataRowView.Item Property (String)

i.e.  One that takes an integer parameter and one that takes a string parameter. These two properties allow you to inspect the data in the various columns exposed by the DataRowView, either by column index or column name. Visual Studio does not know what all has been defined as valid values for the indexes or column names, so it cannot display any of the data from DataRowView via this property. You would have to use the Watch window that I mentioned earlier.
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