Excel - What does the square bracket and @ sign do?

=IF((fruits[Produce_dpt]=[@Produce_dpt])*(fruits[Target]>0),fruits[Target]))

Can someone explain what the square brackets and @ sign mean?
I've worked with if tests before but never seen this.
brothertruffle880Asked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

Glenn RayExcel VBA DeveloperCommented:
This is called "structured referencing" and it relates to how data is referred to in Excel Tables.

The square brackets refer to the "column specifier" or, the row headers.  The @ symbol refers to an item on this same row.

-Glenn


Resources (Microsoft)
Using structured references with Excel tables
Use structured references in Excel table formulas
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
ProfessorJimJamCommented:
Glenn you are very good in Excel.  

and faster than others.  you are catching the questions right after few seconds on the fly when it is posted.

:)
0
Glenn RayExcel VBA DeveloperCommented:
So, reading out this formula (corrected syntax):
=IF((fruits[Produce_dpt]=fruits[@[Produce_dpt]])*(fruits[Target]>0),fruits[Target])

Look in the table "fruits."  If any of the values in the column labeled "Product_dpt" are equal to the value of the Produce_dpt item on this same row (as the formula) AND* the number in the Target column is greater than 0, then return the value of the relative Target.

* The multiplication logic is used to derive this.
0
brothertruffle880Author Commented:
GLENN:
WHEN DID THIS FEATURE COME INTO BEING?   I never heard of it and I've been working in Excel for years!
0
Glenn RayExcel VBA DeveloperCommented:
This came about when Excel changed from "Lists" to formal "Tables" when they released Excel 2007.

If you have Excel 2007 or greater and have the option turned off to see table formulas (Excel Menu: File, Options, Formulas - "Working with formulas" section - "Use table names in formulas") then you might not have ever seen this; just cell references.

I've warmed up to their use recently; I find it convenient to refer to data in a manner similar to database tables.

-Glenn
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Microsoft Excel

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.