"requested operation requires elevation" - how do I get that elevation?

Hi guys,

I have a 64-bit Windows 7 Pro system. It's my personal computer and no-one else accesses it, so when I set-up the user that I login as, I have administrator rights.

In trying to see what ports were being used (to resolve another issue) I opened a DOS window (command prompt) and ran 'netstat -b'. This returned a message 'The requested operation requires elevation.' I can run 'netstat' without a switch and I can run it with other switches, just not the -b switch.

In Googling this message I get the impression it has something to do with file rights/priviledges but I can't seem to make any changes that let me run this switch. And I can't understand why it is so selective with the switch it allows.

Has anyone seen this before, and if you have, were you able to fix it? Attached is a screen shot showing the message returned for netstat and then netstat -b.

Help appreciated.

Carl
CarlAsked:
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Joshua GrantomConnect With a Mentor Systems AdministratorCommented:
You need to right click the command prompt icon and run as administrator, this opens an elevated command prompt window.

cmdadmin.PNG
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David Paris VicenteConnect With a Mentor Systems and Comunications  Administrator Commented:
You could try disable UAC

Start Menu -> Control Panel->User Accounts->User Accounts Control Settings-> And push the button to Never Notify.

Or Right click in cmd.exe and choose run as Administrator.

Let us know if helped.
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Darr247Connect With a Mentor Commented:
Or, when cmd.exe is selected, hold down a Ctrl key and a Shift key and hit Enter.

Either way you do it, you should then receive a User Account Control (UAC) dialog to which you must answer Yes for the elevated prompt to open.UAC dialog for cmd.exe elevation
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it_saigeConnect With a Mentor DeveloperCommented:
To solve your 'requires elevation' issue, you can simply open the command prompt with administrative privileges.

1.  Start
2.  In Search type 'cmd'
3.  Right-click on the cmd.exe item that is found and choose 'Run as administrator'.

You could also create a shortcut on your desktop that allows you to do the same thing.

This happens because even though you may be an administrative user, your user is not a root administrator (to borrow a term from the Unix world).

Microsoft implemented security changes starting with Windows Vista that sort of blurred the lines between root level administration and common administrative tasks (these changes carried over into Windows 7 and Windows 8).

Common administrative tasks are those that can be performed by a user-defined administrative user.  Root level administrative tasks are those that require elevation no matter the the users role on the workstation.  Root level administrative tasks that are accessed from the GUI can be identified by the shield that is added to the lower right hand corner of the task's icon.

These can be semi-turned off by disabling UAC (User Account Control), but doing so is normally frowned upon because your system inherently becomes less secure.

-saige-
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CarlAuthor Commented:
Hi guys,

thanks for your prompt responses. You all provided the solution so I shared out the points.

David, I had tried changing my UAC level but that didn't seem to work. Like you all said, right-clicking and running as Administrator worked.

Thanks
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