Fat freee framework - advice

Hi

I have managed to achieve a real conversation with a real php programmer but it is quote heavy the things

He recommends fat free php frameork which I have looked at before and I do like. Its an mvc (though i dont like bow many frameworks have butchered mvc to get it on the web)

I hopw this is acceptable to question to see if anyone knows any pros and cons of this framework

Thank you
andiejeAsked:
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GaryCommented:
Codeigniter is probably the best but any framework will add extra bloat to any application

https://ellislab.com/codeigniter

http://tutorialcodeigniter.com/beginners/codeigniter-mvc.html
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Ray PaseurCommented:
I never heard of it.  
Not listed here: http://www.sitepoint.com/best-php-frameworks-2014/
Listed #9 here: http://mashable.com/2014/04/04/php-frameworks-build-applications/

If you like it, try it out and build a small application.  The best framework is the one you already know.  Since all of the popular PHP frameworks are open-source you are joining a community when you choose a framework.  If you join a large community you'll get access to more expertise than if you join a small community.  You might want to look for a user's group near you, just to get a reality check on your plans.
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Julian HansenCommented:
This is a bit of an open ended question. You are going to find as many opinions on the different frameworks as there are frameworks out there - all exist for a reason - because someone saw a gap and tried to fill it.

For me it depends entirely on what you plan to use the framework for - some are good for certain tasks and lousy for others so to recommend one over the other without having a concrete knowledge of the application is not really useful.

In my experience many frameworks tend toward the bloat side of things - for obvious reasons - resulting in a sledge-hammer  to crack a nut while others fall somewhat short when it comes to certain applications. I believe the horses for courses phrase applies.

If I was making the decision it would be about long term longevity of the code

1. Is there an active community supporting the framework
2. How actively is it being developed / updated
3. What is it's security profile like
4. How easily will I be able to find people to support it (linked to 1)
5. How good is the documentation for the framework - samples, tutorials, wiki's etc
6. How good is the fit to my requirement set - how much additional  development would be required to fill the missing functionality gaps.

6 is important because if the development component is high i.e. the FW + plugins do not substantially cover what needs to be done you might be better off pursuing an alternative route - like a custom framework.

Just some questions I would ask before signing on for any specific framework.
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Olaf DoschkeSoftware DeveloperCommented:
It all depends on what your site needs. Just a few days ago I posted a level 101 article about "The simplest CMS".

It mainly addresses how to build a small website with just static content and avoid to have to repeat the navigation (or any other part) for every html page by having a simple script putting together the single parts of each page by SSI or php include.

It's surely also very "fat free", as it's very little code.

The topic framework is double-edged sword. On the one side it helps getting faster results, on the other side you have a learning curve of how to use it. If you're a PHP beginner the learning curve of using a framework can partly take away the need to learn PHP, if the framework functionality totally fits your needs and is the solution for your type of application. But you can only really judge a framework, if you know basic PHP and can read how details of it work and are written.

Then it of course depends if you start from scratch or have an existing site you want to migrate to using a framework. To avoid learning much the best solution can be to neither do a site with native PHP nor by adding a framework, but by using a CMS best fitting the site concept and customizing it. Many CMS systems have a core API, which is extensible for developers. That can really help you to concentrate on the core thing of your site or application, that differentiates it from any current site.

Bye, Olaf.
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