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Losing connection to access database located on cloud server

I am getting the attached error message when accessing an access 2010 database that is located on a cloud server.  It happens intermittently.  Other applications, can be accessed with no problems.  The problem seem limited to Access.  This is the only Access database that is located on the cloud server and multiple users access it.  I'd like to get some ideas of what could be causing this problem.  The network guys are stumped and I am looking for fresh ideas on what could be causing this problem.  The error message does not appear to be an Access error message.
disconnect.jpg
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chtullu135
Asked:
chtullu135
2 Solutions
 
Kelvin SparksCommented:
You haven't described how you connect. It is typical of a remote desktop disconnect.

I use these regularly, and usually only see this if a VPN is in place and that disconnects. It can be momentarily - other internets sessions will reconnect, but a VPN one will need the VPN to re-establish itself.

Alternately, the cloud provider may have a firewall or similar plan in place that drops connections after a set amount of time. This can be quite common for RDP sessions (typically between 30 and 120 minutes).


Kelvin
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
<<I am getting the attached error message when accessing an access 2010 database that is located on a cloud server.  It happens intermittently.>>

 Your problem is not Access; it's RD (Remote Desktop).    

 You've got a logon to a remote server through RDP and that's what's getting disconnected.  You may be using Access, but this has nothing to do with Access.

Jim.
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chtullu135Author Commented:
Thanks Jim,  I haven't noticed that problem occurred with other applications.  However, since the problem is intermittent, it could very well be happening with other applications..  Kelvin's point about a firewall dropping connections after a set time may also be contributing factor.  It may be that the users are using accessing the access database and not closing the connection when they are done.  I'll ask the users.
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PatHartmanCommented:
Access is the canary in the coal mine so to speak when it comes to flaky connections.  Access has a very close connection with it's BE and can't recover gracefully from intermittent drops.

You might have to convert the BE to SQL Server.  Since Access expects to connect and disconnect to a SQL Server BE, it is more stable in this situation.
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Gustav BrockCIOCommented:
Jim is right. This has nothing to do with Access as it runs at the remote site.

It is solely a loss of connection between the user's Remote Desktop client and the remote server. The client is quite sensitive to drops of connection, and you'll see the message; however, it is also quite good to regain normal operation once the connection is reestablished.

/gustav
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chtullu135Author Commented:
Hello Pat,  
Why would using a SQL server backend make the connections more stable.  I mean it sounds right.  I imagine since SQL server is designed from the get-go to be used as a backend, it is inherently more stable than an Access backend
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
@chtullu,

  The connection Access has with a DB file is not the issue here, it's your connection to a remote desktop server that is getting cut off.  As Kelvin said, that may be by design.    RDP sessions can be set to disconnect or log off after a certain amount of time or a certain amount of time of inactivity.  Then on top of that is all the usual stuff, like an actual flaky connection over a VPN.

  But yes, SQL Server is by far more robust because it has a server side process that acts as a door man for the DB.   No one gets to the DB otherwise and all connections run through the door man.

  in contrast, with a JET or ACE DB (the default DB for Access), every client reaches out to the DB file and manipulates it directly.   There is no server side process.  The server acts as nothing more than a file sharing device.

Jim.
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chtullu135Author Commented:
That makes a lot of sense Jim.  Thanks.
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chtullu135Author Commented:
Thanks for the help.  I am advising the client to migrate the backend to sql server
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