what purpose is the check scan option in tune2fs

what purpose  is the check scan option in tune2fs

doing some math on our systems, we have a reboot patch about every other month which counts as a "mount".  the file system is checked every 38 mounts.

if my logic is correct, the file system will be checked at the 3 year mark an then again at the 6 year mark. At the 6 year mark we hope to have the system replaced.

If a system is 5 years old it likely has had 1 filesystem check and is due for one in a year ( which the system will likely not ever see )

We also have devices that get rebooted less than twice a year so they would be checked every 20 years

It appears that in a production environment it would run 1 time in the lifetime of the server.
TIMFOX123Asked:
Who is Participating?

[Product update] Infrastructure Analysis Tool is now available with Business Accounts.Learn More

x
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

Gerwin Jansen, EE MVETopic Advisor Commented:
You calculation looks OK to me. In production systems however, reboots are not that frequent in my experience. If you want your filesystem checked every month, modify your filesystem parameters like this: (assuming /dev/sda1)

# tune2fs -i 1m /dev/sda1
tune2fs 1.42.8 (20-Jun-2013)
Setting interval between checks to 2592000 seconds

This would mean that your sda1 file system would be checked every 1 month.

See "man tune2fs" for more information.

To show your current settings:

# tune2fs -l /dev/sda1

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
rindiCommented:
That is a very long time without a file-system check. You could get file-system corruptions without the problem being noticed. The interval you have set now is more suited for Desktop OS's where the user probably reboots and shuts the PC down more often. I would reduce the count so it gets checked more often, maybe even everytime you service the (reboot) the server. You can do that with the following command (as root):

tune2fs -c 1 /dev/YourVolume

I'd also suggest that you constantly check the status of your array and disks in it using the RAID controller's utility so you know their health (checking the file-system won't tell you the health of the disks themselves), and also always test your backups.
nociSoftware EngineerCommented:
And a check of the rootfs can only take place during boot, other FS can be checked by dismounting them after stopping all applications using that volume.
then check & mount & restart apps.
TIMFOX123Author Commented:
thank you
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Linux

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.