how to combine multiple sql queries in ms access

MS Access
SQL
Combining Statements (several into one)

I have several SQL statements...
CREATE TABLE A...
INSERT INTO TABLE A...
CREATE TABLE B...
INSERT INTO TABLE B...
CREATE TABLE C...
INSERT INTO TABLE C...

... and will add others. I would like to execute several in sequence and would like to know the best practice for combining multiple statements in MS Access.
Henry Gage, Jr.Senior Business Analyst, Project Manager & ConsultantAsked:
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Phillip BurtonDirector, Practice Manager and Computing ConsultantCommented:
Use VBA to call each query in turn.
0
Henry Gage, Jr.Senior Business Analyst, Project Manager & ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hello,

Thanks for the comment. Is there also a way to combine the statements within MS Access without using VBA? I reason I am asking is because I want to run several as a group. For example I may want to drop or delete a table, create the table, load the table and export the table with one user event (on click).


Is your larger point that it is better to use VBA combined with MS Access because it enable a developer to govern the user experience by adding better UI controls, thus leading to an application?
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Phillip BurtonDirector, Practice Manager and Computing ConsultantCommented:
1. Yes - you could use a macro instead of VBA.
2. Not necessarily, because the only ways are: manually executing each query in turn; using a macro; using VBA.
However, it's fairly easy to do it in VBA:

DoCmd.OpenQuery "MyQuery"

Open in new window

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Phillip BurtonDirector, Practice Manager and Computing ConsultantCommented:
In SQL Server, you could do:
Create Table1 (myfields int)
GO
Create Table2 (myfields int)
GO

but you can't do that in Access.
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Henry Gage, Jr.Senior Business Analyst, Project Manager & ConsultantAuthor Commented:
I've requested that this question be closed as follows:

Accepted answer: 167 points for Phillip Burton's comment #a40365831
Assisted answer: 167 points for Phillip Burton's comment #a40365809
Assisted answer: 0 points for Henry Gage, Jr.'s comment #a40365820
Assisted answer: 166 points for Phillip Burton's comment #a40365829

for the following reason:

I included my comment as clarification of the questions and to keep a thread context.
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
If you need something like an "all or nothing" scenario, then use Transactions instead of Macros. Transactions allow you to process a group of SQL statements as a whole, and the entire group can be cancelled in the event of a failure of one item.

Using VBA, if you enclose everything in a Transaction, then no changes are made to the live tables until you Commit the transactions. That's not so with Macros, or with calling individual queries via VBA. In other words, without a Transaction it's possible to Delete the Table, but then the CREATE or INSERT statements fail - and you're left with no table!
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