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Identifying commit charge peak memory

I am using this article to identify correct page file usage. It references the below but I  am unsure on 2008 server where I get the commit charge peak number from. The server is non R2


To optimally size your paging file you should start all the applications you run at the same time, load typical data sets, and then note the commit charge peak (or look at this value after a period of time where you know maximum load was attained). Set the paging file minimum to be that value minus the amount of RAM in your system (if the value is negative, pick a minimum size to permit the kind of crash dump you are configured for). If you want to have some breathing room for potentially large commit demands, set the maximum to double that number.
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Sid_F
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Sid_F
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ZabagaRCommented:
Download Process Explorer from SysInternals. In fact, download the entire Suite of SysInternals Tools. Extremely useful and free, stand-alone executables. See my screenshot attached from Process Explorer's memory tab.

SysInternal's Process Explorer:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx

Also see this memory article.  Over the course of windows editions, different terms have been used to describe the same memory concepts and other terms were changed - which confuses the issue.  

http://blogs.technet.com/b/markrussinovich/archive/2008/11/17/3155406.aspx
process-exp.jpg
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Sid_FAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the links but I am specifically trying to find out where I locate the commit charge peak number from.
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ZabagaRCommented:
Microsoft changes around the terminology frequently enough that you're not going to find that exact phrase in 2008 non-R2.

You definitely can find that value easily if you run the Process Explorer app I linked to. It will display commit charge peak, which is the peak since windows started.

If you don't want to download anything, go to Administrative Tools -> Reliability and Performance
See my screenshot.  Set up a performance data collector set. By default the System Performance one will grab what you want; it only runs for 1 minute. You can customize your own data collector sets to run for how long you want and grab whatever information you require.

The commit charge peak would be the Committed Bytes Maximum I noted. The difference here between the SysInternals version and windows 2008 built in is that the Sysinternals peak value is from when the machine started and the maximum/peak value from Reliability and Performance is the peak from when you started collecting your data, not machine start up.

I really think if you looked into this a bit you'd find there are plenty of ways of grabbing the exact same information. I'm not sure why you're hung up on the phrase "commit charge peak".
mem.JPG
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Sid_FAuthor Commented:
Excellent thank you
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