Access 2007 & Access 2013

I currently have an Access 2007 split DB that is working correctly. The IT dept has asked for me to test a computer with MS Office 2013. I opened my Access 2007 DB in Access 2013 and everything seemed fine. Other users started reporting to me that different things were not working in the Access 2007 Front End DB . I discovered that in Access 2007 VB, Tools, References that the MS Office 15.0 Access database engine Object Library was checked "MISSING". I unchecked the box and everthing started working fine again.

How do I make the Access 2007 Split DB work with both Access 2007 & 2013?
CMILLERAsked:
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hnasrCommented:
Check where the error occurs. If the respective reference is not added, then code may fail.
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
You have to be careful not to make any modifications or use a database on a machine that has Access 2013 installed and then hand it to the users that have Access 2007.

They also cannot share a single front end.

The reason is that when you open in Access 2013, the references are "Auto updated".   If you turn around and hand this db back to a Access 2007 user, the references are now set for Access 2013, and you get the error.

Jim.
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PatHartmanCommented:
I think MS allows this situation to continue as a means to force us to upgrade even when we don't want to.  If it can automatically promote a reference when you go from A2007 to A2013, it can automatically demote it.  If your app doesn't work with the older library, the problem is yours not theirs.  Please complain to MS.  It is the only way we have to influence what they fix.  If no one complains, it must not be broken and so they will not devote any resources to it.

An alternative which you may have to adopt if you have to work in a newer version than your users is to switch to late binding.  Early binding requires us to specifically declare objects in the coding stage.  The benefit of this is we get intellisense, constants, and compile time errors.  Switching to late binding means we don't have intellisense, we need to define our own constants instead of using the ones exposed by the library we are linking to, and we don't find most errors until runtime.  Not to mention that early binding is faster since references are resolved once at compile time rather than each time they are used at run time.

The best solution is to have every one on the same version.  If that is not possible, your best alternative is to develop in the oldest version.  That way, you will guarantee it will work on all the computers.
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
Nothing in VBA is going to get fixed at this point.  It's the web, the web, and nothing but the web.

  Although I have to say, I was shocked they even did a 64 bit version, so one can always hope I guess.

Jim.
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PatHartmanCommented:
I think you're right Jim but hope springs eternal.  When the bloom is off the rose and people figure out what they have lost, there might be a resurgence of client/server if there are any of us old fashioned developers still left standing.
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
<<When the bloom is off the rose and people figure out what they have lost, there might be a resurgence of client/server if there are any of us old fashioned developers still left standing. >>

 Not to get to side tracked, but depending on the company and their needs, many are finding the "Cloud" is really not all it's cracked up to be.

  It takes a decent sized and reliable internet connection to start, which many don't realize and can't get.  I've got one client now that has a 1.5MB up/down and that's the best they can get.

 I think the niche ultimately will be hosted services for many (no on premise stuff), but SAAS for most will have limited appeal in many cases as your stuck with whatever someone hands you.    I'm actually waiting to see what the ultimate cost is for companies with Office 365 in training and productivity, when after a few years they are forced to constantly adapt to the latest version a couple of times.    This is the first real large scale test of SAAS and it will be interesting to see the outcome.

 I think many won't be happy, but then of course I've been before too<g>.

Jim.
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