MS Access Global Variables, Timeouts, and Security

I have an application that I am building that has a low level requirement for security. I am planning on having a user table that stores login IDs, passwords, and security information about what objects they can access and what they cannot.

Upon successfully logging in, I was going to store their USERID in a global variable to be available throughout the application.

If I do this, can the application timeout such that the Global Variable loses it's value?
If so, what is the timeout period?
Any finally, is there a better way to store this info as they navigate and use the application?

Thanks!
GenesisTechAsked:
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Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
Regarding the Global Variables portion of this question eyeballeth thy article on Table Based Access Variables, which will demonstrate a wompload of options on how to pull this off.
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DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP)Database Architect / Systems AnalystCommented:
Yes ... there is a better way that Global Variables ... just for starters >> TempVars

Short tutorial on TempVars by Access MVP Juan Soto

http://blogs.office.com/b/microsoft-access/archive/2010/09/27/power-tip-maximize-the-user-of-tempvars-in-access-2007-and-2010.aspx

And TempVars can be called from a query ... which is pretty cool ... and they do not get reset if an error occurs, etc.

The application is not going to 'time out' all by itself. That would be under your control as a developer.

mx
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
You other option is to open a hidden form at start up and store items in unbound controls.

Jim.
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PatHartmanCommented:
In most cases I use the hidden form technique suggested by Jim D because when I am testing, I can leave the form visible and watch all the variables or even change them manually.  I have also used the table based technique suggested by Jim H.  The table based method is excellent for when you need to retain values between sessions.  I do it a little differently though.  I keep the table in the BE rather than the FE.  That means that all users share the same physical table and so I need to include their ID along with the variableID.  When you keep the table in the FE, it is specific to a single user so you don't need to worry about the userID but you do loose the settings when the FE is replaced and users don't like that.
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GenesisTechAuthor Commented:
Awesome. I was not aware of TempVars. Excellent Solution - Thanks!
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