T-SQL square brackets around a parameter

I just had an SSRS developer ask me to put [ ] around a parameter eg [@ParameterName] in every WHERE clause in my stored procedure. I am curious to know why. The name is probably the same as a column in one of the tables but it really is something generic that is found in a lot of other sp's. So I am not sure why.

Thanks
phil916Asked:
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Phillip BurtonDirector, Practice Manager and Computing ConsultantCommented:
Sometimes they are optional, and people like to do it for style.

Sometimes they are not (for instance, if it is a reserved word or has a space in it), and they are therefore needed.

Either way, there's no harm in it. Some people like them; some don't.
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Haris DulicCommented:
When using reserved names you must put the brackets around it in order for the SQL server to accept it..

select [select] from table_name..

Although you can use it, I strongly suggest you not to use it since it can cause unwanted results...

Here you can find complete list of reserved names : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189822%28v=sql.105%29.aspx
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phil916Author Commented:
OK it is syntactically correct but I hope you caught that it was a parameter or variable beginning with an @. As long as the variable is still in scope you cannot have a duplicate so it should be unambiguous. It is also most definitely not a keyword as it is industry specific.

I don't like folks who tell me to make changes and not explain why or why it is a problem for them. At the very least I could learn something and avoid the problem in the future.
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Phillip BurtonDirector, Practice Manager and Computing ConsultantCommented:
Part of it is because brackets are often used in SSRS than in SSMS. It is the default used by the Wizards - see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-GB/library/dd220516.aspx as examples of what the wizards do.
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Scott PletcherSenior DBACommented:
Adding the brackets prevents potential errors later.  Thus, it makes perfect sense.  Who knows what names will be used in the future, or even what new names might become "reserved" that are not today.
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