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i7 4790K - hi end machine- better to build it ourselves?

Posted on 2014-10-12
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would you recommending building this from scratch? or just a bundle or directly from dell? what are the pros and cons each way?

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=9509248
http://www.amazon.com/Intel-i7-4790K-Processor-Cache-BX80646I74790K/dp/B00KPRWAX8
http://www.bestbuy.com/site/cyberpowerpc-gamer-xtreme-desktop-intel-core-i7-8gb-memory-2tb-hard-drive/6750078.p

prefer support for multiple monitors later on. do you have to plan for it now itself in the purchase?

thanks-
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Question by:25112
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rindi earned 189 total points
ID: 40375399
Personally I think buying the finished product is usually more economical than buying the parts and putting them together. Also, it is always possible that you get a wrong CPU or RAM or something else that isn't compatible by mistake. A finished product on the other hand should just work, and if it doesn't, you have warranty on it and you don't have to go troubleshooting until you find which part isn't working yourself.

Most PC's today have multiple Video outputs, like VGA, DVI and HDMI, and most of the time you can use those simultaneously so you can use at least 2 displays.
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by:25112
ID: 40375404
then, you would recommend the bestbuy link from the above?
if you needed more than 2 monitor support (later.. couple of months down the road), what else do you need to add to this purchase now?
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by:rindi
rindi earned 189 total points
ID: 40375412
I don't really recommend any specific sites to buy PC's. I'd rather walk into a shop nearby and see what they have, then go to another shop and do the same, then compare.

Look at the back of the PC where you see the ports it has. You should see how many video outputs it has, and if it has more than 2, ask the vendor whether all of them can be used simultaneously. If not, you can always add one or more graphic cards at a later stage.
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by:Rizzle
Rizzle earned 125 total points
ID: 40375527
I agree with Rindi on this one. In some cases its sometimes cheaper to build your machine based off the specs for the ones you posted but this can come with some negatives.

1. Machine won't be under warranty.
2. Sometimes the parts you buy aren't compatible with the motherboard you have installed.

These days its cheaper to buy a machine that's already built as it will come with manufacturer warranty/support.

I'm in the same conundrum to be honest and looking at saving £50 probably isn't worth the hassle of me buying the parts and then the machine not working due to a component being faulty or even not being compatible.
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by:rindi
rindi earned 189 total points
ID: 40375549
Usually buying the parts is more expensive in the end. The manufacturers can buy them in bulk, which makes them cheaper for them, and they usually have additional contracts with the parts makers to get even better prices. Besides, there is quite a large competition between the PC builders, so they can't get too high prices for them, and often there are discounts. They usually don't make much profits from selling PC's, but rather from additional services, like extended support etc.
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by:Rizzle
Rizzle earned 125 total points
ID: 40375552
From what i've looked into its been cheaper for me. That's because I use a specialist in the field who gets major discounts. I wouldn't recommend buying a PC directly from the likes of Dell, Lenovo or HP because places like eBay and eBuyer would offer the same sort of spec PC with warranty for a few hundreds cheaper.
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by:garycase
garycase earned 62 total points
ID: 40375553
A bit of counterpoint ...

While it's certainly convenient to buy a pre-configured system, it's (a) not always less expensive; and (b) does NOT have a better warranty ... although clearly it will have better service under the warranty, since you'll have some tech support at isolating any problems.

For example, using the CyberPower system you noted at Best Buy as an example:

=>  It has a 1 year warranty.   If you built this yourself, most motherboards have a 3 year warranty;  an i7-4790k has a 3 year warranty;  most memory from reputable suppliers (Corsair, Crucial, Kingston, etc.)  has a lifetime warranty;  quality power supplies are generally warranted for 5-7 years;  etc.    So a "build it yourself" system will have at least a 3 year warranty -- the difference is that you have to do your own isolation of failures [with, of course, help from your friendly not-so-local EE friends :-) ]

=>  As for cost:   To replicate the CyberPower system using high-quality components would cost (based on a "cart" I just built at Newegg)  ~ $960  ($958.43 to be precise) excluding an OS.   With an OS it would total about $1075 ... very close to the Best Buy system's cost, but with nearly free shipping ($9.95) and no tax.    And of course if you were buying the parts yourself, you could customize them to be more precisely what you want ... for example, I'd buy 16GB instead of 8GB of RAM, and you may want an SSD or hybrid drive for your primary system drive.

Also, unless you're a gamer, the on-chip graphics on a 4790k is PLENTY good enough for most folks ... and you'd save $200 by not buying a GTX 760  (I included that in the cost above to match the CyberPower system).
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by:Merete
Merete earned 62 total points
ID: 40379454
What is your purpose of use for your new computer?
Only  HD 3D Games, intense video editing? Photo editing with high tech software?
A lot of multi tasking?

There's building your own with picking your parts and then there is building your own out of a prebuilt by modifying the parts to suit your own needs.
Once you pick your own parts and have someone build it for you if you prefer,
 you'll never go back to OEM or prebuilds.
But you have to know your parts.
Besides Intel there is also AMD Athlon which is excellent performance.
The difference can be marginal, though, depending on what you're trying to do. You may struggle to notice much difference in gaming performance, and if you're planning to overclock your chosen CPU – and your target applications make good use of multiple cores – then AMD may sometimes offer equivalent or better speeds for much less cash.
The major performance increase could be in graphics the power for your games.
Brand Guide - Which Brands are Good?
http://whirlpool.net.au/wiki/rmp_bg

These days I preferred method is to pick out a prebuild and then swap the parts for my own choice.
What you would need to build your own,
a server tower with good ventilation / and one that has SD card reader in front with at least 4 USB ports in front and rear
and the front loading audio and mic
Power supply unit I prefer Antec
ram
WD HDD
GPU video card if you prefer video card I prefer nvidia gigabyte
tower fans
Windows OS setup disc<< this is very important to run and fix your system. OEM do not have this disc.
you'll also get the discs with drivers for the motherboard and video card and that usually has a game with it.
Doing it yourself your system will not be a brand name like DEL.
Do you need a keyboard and mouse?
A monitor?
What is your budget?
If your interested refer to this EE question yesterday I participated in, here in I show what I built and why.
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/Computer_Games/Q_28536024.html#a40379266

The last i7 you picked looks good but it has windows 8 I'd get rid of that and put windows 7 professional x64 on.
As you can see it gets rating of 2.
http://www.bestbuy.com/site/cyberpowerpc-gamer-xtreme-desktop-intel-core-i7-8gb-memory-2tb-hard-drive/6750078.p
4th Gen Intel® Core™ i7-4790K processor
includes graphics onboard
http://ark.intel.com/products/80807/Intel-Core-i7-4790K-Processor-8M-Cache-up-to-4_40-GHz
Intel Fourth Generation Core i7 4790K Review
http://www.overclockersclub.com/reviews/intel_core_i7_4790k/
Hope it helps
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by:George Tokas
George Tokas earned 62 total points
ID: 40379932
>>What is your purpose of use for your new computer?
>>Only  HD 3D Games, intense video editing? Photo editing with high tech software?
>>A lot of multi tasking?

Those are my first questions too...
Also agree with garycase since only once I had a PC that didn't made it myself back in the days of 386...
Since that time I am building PC's for myself, friends and clients usually cost cheaper than mainstream shops cost.
But all depending on WHAT you want to do and also IF YOU have the basic skills to do the build/install/modding/whatever needed.
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by:25112
ID: 40383594
thank you- your coverage of the question from both aspects have been helpful, and also the reviews and your experience.

appreciate it- it helps in going forward for this system and perhaps next also.
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by:Merete
ID: 40385965
Thanks and all the best ..
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