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Count non-numeric values in a worksheet range

Posted on 2014-10-12
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Last Modified: 2014-10-13
I'm exporting some data from Access to Excel.  In Access the data type of several of the columns is Text, but these columns only contain numeric values (no leading zeros).

When I export this data to Excel, it treats the data as text as well, but I would like convert it to a number.  I've found that the Excel Range.TextToColumns method works to convert these values to numbers, so after exporting, I go to the various columns and use that method to convert the data.

Now I'm working on a more generic routine, and I don't want to hard code the column names, I simply want to test the data type of the field.  If it is text, I want to count to see if any of the "values" in that range are non-numeric.  If they are, then I won't do the conversion, but if all of the cells in a range are numeric, then I'll do the conversion.

So, is there a method or function in Excel which will allow me to get a count of the non-numeric cells in a range?
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Question by:Dale Fye (Access MVP)
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Expert Comment

by:Rgonzo1971
ID: 40375860
Hi,

pls try

Result = Evaluate("COUNTA(A1:A100)-COUNT(A1:A100*1)")


Regards
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Author Comment

by:Dale Fye (Access MVP)
ID: 40376746
Rgonzo,

I already have a rng object, and when I do:

Evaluate("CountA(rng)") it returns 1, even if the range has hundreds of rows with values.

and

Evaluate("Count(rng*1)") is returning zero (0) because it is apparently not recognizing these text values as numbers.

I've already got a little function that loops through the cells of the range and counts them, then uses IsNumeric to determine whether the cell is numeric, but was just wondering whether this could be done with a single line.

Dale
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Expert Comment

by:Rob Henson
ID: 40376752
In Access the data type of several of the columns is Text, but these columns only contain numeric values (no leading zeros).

You have only numeric values. Would it not make sense to therefore change the data type in Access?

Thanks
Rob H
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Accepted Solution

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Rgonzo1971 earned 500 total points
ID: 40376807
Hi,

maybe

Res = Evaluate("COUNTA(" & Rng.Address & ")-COUNT(" & Rng.Address & " * 1)")

Regards
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Author Comment

by:Dale Fye (Access MVP)
ID: 40376829
Rob,

It would yes, but for compatibility between Access and other databases where the data originally came from, I have left it as text (makes it much less complicated to perform joins on those fields).

Rgonzo,

What is the purpose of the "*1" in your function?
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Expert Comment

by:Rgonzo1971
ID: 40376843
*1
transforms the a numeric value as text to a number in an array formula

Regards
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Author Closing Comment

by:Dale Fye (Access MVP)
ID: 40376855
This seems to have done the trick.  Thanks.
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