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  • Status: Solved
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Changing a CLOB to a Varchar2

Hi Experts,

I have a situation where we have a CLOB when it should have been a varchar2(4000). We know that no data exceeds 4000 characters and want to convert the datatype.

I have created a new column of type Varchar2(4000 CHAR) successfully.
When I try and update the table to set the new column I get a constraint error and it is talking about deleting data

My code is

      ALTER TABLE XXX ADD TITLE_VAR VARCHAR2(4000 CHAR);
     
      UPDATEXXX SET TITLE_VAR = SUBSTR (TITLE, 1, 4000);
     
      ALTER TABLE XXX DROP COLUMN TITLE;
     
      ALTER TABLE XXX RENAME COLUMN TITLE_VAR TO TITLE;

The 1st line executes correctly, the second line however gives the following

SQL Error: ORA-02292: integrity constraint (AQD.FK_QACKLISTRES_QACKLISTITM) violated - child record found
02292. 00000 - "integrity constraint (%s.%s) violated - child record found"
*Cause:    attempted to delete a parent key value that had a foreign
           dependency.
*Action:   delete dependencies first then parent or disable constraint.

The foreign key being referred to is the primary key for this table being referenced by another table. The old and new columns being changed are not part of any relationship.

This error makes me think that Oracle is deleting the table and recreating - I can't think of any reason for this error.

It just doesn't make sense. The version of Oracle is 11.2.0.4 Enterprise with the code being run through SQL Developer.

I can't find any reference to this in any material anywhere. The solution I am using is widely quoted.

Does anyone have any ideas?

Kelvin
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Kelvin Sparks
Asked:
Kelvin Sparks
1 Solution
 
Wasim Akram ShaikCommented:
Cannot recreate your scenario, but have you given a try using dbms_redefinition package and sync the tables?, this should work without any errors, use primary key as it seems you already have one on your table..

For Sample illustrations of how to use dbms_redefinition, check burleson site..

http://www.dba-oracle.com/t_dbms_redefinition_example.htm
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johnsoneSenior Oracle DBACommented:
My guess would be a trigger, or a constraint that was created with ENABLE NO VALIDATE.

I would check for triggers first.
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Kelvin SparksAuthor Commented:
Thanks Johnsone

All it took was a fresh approach when the problem  caused me to become tunnel visioned. A trigger was the culprit - you just don't fire a trigger for a sequence on update! Not sure how this got in - and is a rarely updated table.

Thanks for the fresh view!
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