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See what my MS Access user interface looks like in a different screen resolution.

I am creating an Access2010 database for someone else.
My problem is that his screen is smaller than my screen.
I want to see on my screen what he will see on his screen.
My screen is 1600 x 900.
His screen is 1366 x 768.
I am using Windows 7
Does anybody know how to do that?
I was thinking of creating a window on my screen that is equal to the smaller screen and viewing my user interface whithin its boundaries.

(I know of ways to adapt forms from one resolution to another, but that is not what I want. I also know online sites wher you can view your website at different resolutions. this is also not what I need.)
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Fritz Paul
Asked:
Fritz Paul
1 Solution
 
Russell FoxDatabase DeveloperCommented:
You should be able to right-click on the desktop and select "Screen Resolution". Then there's a dropdown where you can select a new resolution. The exact one may not be there depending on your pixel density and aspect ratio, but you should be able to get close.
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EirmanCommented:
It would appear that you can have forms resize themselves depending on screen resolution
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/138901

Personally, I wouldn't bother with the above, and would create a template form @ 1366 x 768
and base everything on that.

Is your friend's present resolution, a chosen one, or the default that came with the pc/laptop?

As I deal with older people quite a lot, I find that they are frequently delighted when I reduce the resolution.

 ... you could of course make a cardboard cutout and hold it up against the screen -:)
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PatHartmanCommented:
Eirman,
That link is useless without the code it uses.  You need the book or the sample files it comes with -
Microsoft Access 2 Developer's Handbook. Ken Getz, Paul Litwin,
   Greg Reddick. Sybex: 1994 ISBN: 0-7821-1327-3
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
That's really not what Fritz wants anyway.

@Fritz,

  Use the MoveSize command to scale your form to the correct size.   They will appear smaller on your screen because your resolution is higher, but they will be the correct size when viewed else where.

  I think however you'd be better to do as Russell suggested and actually change your screen resolution to match.

 But even with that, there may be a couple of issues:

1. If your using a LCD (and who's not), only one resolution is nice and sharp and it's probably the one your set to.  Other's will be fuzzy

2. Your end user might have an altered DPI ratio.

 Given that, it's generally best to let users scale the forms on their own with the code that Pat was talking about, or not to re-invent the wheel, use Shrink Stretcher from Peter's Software.

Jim.
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Fritz PaulAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your cooperation.
The best option is the cardboard cutout idea.
I Created a form with markers on and had it opened on the client machine. Then I had a screenshot returned. I then made marks on my screen frame to show the extent of the client screen. It works perfectly.
I said I did not want an auto scaling procedure, as I am designing for a specific screen.
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EirmanCommented:
Another Idea (and a much better one) ....
Connect a second monitor and set it to the resolution of your friend's monitor.
Set the second monitor to mirror the first (rather than having an extended desktop).
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