Microsoft access with VBA

When using Access VBA Programming, there is no executable created outside of the Access application correct?

In other words, there is no stand alone program created by using Microsoft Access with VBA programming.
All of the execution is done within Microsoft Access application using the objects like forms and reports that associate with VBA.

So all users must have the Microsoft Access application which has access to an access database with these components like Reports or Forms. Thus the users are sharing an access database.
Lawrence AverySystem DeveloperAsked:
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Haris DulicCommented:
You are right, in Access all objects are in the access file and if you  more than one user to open and use the access application you need to share it.

One way you can go is that you have 2 access databases one which will hold the data and one which will hold all the forms, reports etc. in this way you will have clients - server infrastructure.

In order for users to run the access application , they can have the Access Runtime which enables user to run the Access application without having the Access installed.
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HuaMin ChenProblem resolverCommented:
Yes, we have to provide the relevant Access DB for users to access the application.
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
All of what you said is correct.   The only thing I'd add to what samo4fun said is:

1. The run time version of Access is freely downloadable for A2007 and up.

2. Run time mode is not the same as full mode; no design features are enabled, nor are there any wizards.  

  You can see how run time mode works by using the /runtime switch when starting a DB or name it .accdr if your using A2007 and up.

Jim.
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Luke ChungPresidentCommented:
Yes, its similar to Excel or Word where a file can be sent to others who can open it if they have the associated product.

Using a split database architecture is critical for supporting a multiuser environment or another user while you are developing (if overwriting or losing their data is an issue). Wrote a whitepaper on splitting a database here: http://fmsinc.com/MicrosoftAccess/DatabaseSplitter/index.html
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PatHartmanCommented:
Thus the users are sharing an access database.
No.  They don't share a database.  Each individual has his own personal copy of the FE.  Just as you install software on individual PCs, you "install" the FE part of the application on each user's PC.  The FE links to the BE which IS shared and resides on a server.  The only thing the BE contains is tables.  The FE contains all the application parts.

You are correct in that there is no executable.  As others have mentioned, you must have either the full version of Access or the Access Runtime engine (a free download from A2007 on).  (you need specific .dll's to run VB applications and the .net framework to run .net apps so this is not unusual or burdensome)  Before you distribute the FE, you "compile" it into an .accde.  That turns all the source code into p-code which is partially compiled and the source is removed from the application.  That makes forms/reports/modules unavailable for change in the .accde although users can still mess around with tables (local only)/macros/queries.  So, you MUST keep the original .accdb in a safe place because if you need to make any modifications in the future, you will need to go back to the .accdb, make the changes, and generate a new .accde.

To make the FE slightly less vulnerable to tampering by users, rename it to .accdr.  This doesn't protect it, it just keeps the user from opening it in design view.  Of course, a savvy user may know he can simply rename the file so making the .accde first is best.
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Microsoft Access

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