Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 566
  • Last Modified:

How do Copy, move, and rename a file in SSIS

Good Morning,

I have a ssis package that I have created that basically moves data from a csv to a staging table then to a production table.  I want to automate the process.  

The file is downloaded to a directory

the file name is : GCPeclass_Course Report_2015_Semester_2014-10-12.csv and it is located \\ms01\courseinfo
the file name changes depending on the date.  ex.

eclass_Course Report_2015_Semester_2014-10-12.csv
eclass_Course Report_2015_Semester_2014_10_7.csv
eclass_Course Report_2015_Semester_2014-9-21.csv

when I get this file I want to  

copy the file

Move the original file to a folder called archive -\\ms01\courseinfo\archive

rename GCPeclass_Course Report_2015_Semester_2014-10-12 - Copy.csv
to GCPeclass_Course Report
0
Butterfly2
Asked:
Butterfly2
  • 3
  • 2
1 Solution
 
Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
For starters, in the Control Flow add a File System Object (FSO) component, then double-click to edit the properties..
0
 
Butterfly2Author Commented:
Hi Jim,

I have gotten that far already.  I need assistance because the name changes(basically the last part of the file name is a date).
0
 
Christopher GordonSenior Developer AnalystCommented:
@Butterfly2

I don't think you'll be able to accomplish this with the File System Object (if u figure it out I'm interested in how you pulled it off).  

I usually end up using a "Script Task" and C# System.IO.File in order to pull this off.  It is additional coding though.

Maybe do something like this in your "script task":

 private static bool MoveAndOverWrite(string sSource, string sDestn)
        {
            try
            {
                if (System.IO.File.Exists(sSource) == true)
                {
                    System.IO.File.Copy(sSource, sDestn, true);

                    System.IO.File.Delete(sSource);

                    return true;                   
                }
                else
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Specifed file does not exist");

                    return true;
                }
            }
            catch (System.IO.FileNotFoundException exFile)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("File Not Found " + exFile.Message);

                return false;
            }
            catch (System.IO.DirectoryNotFoundException exDir)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Directory Not Found " + exDir.Message);

                return false;
            }

            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);

                return false;
            }
        }

Open in new window


If you decide to go this route and need more direction, plz post a follow up question.  Thx
0
Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

 
Butterfly2Author Commented:
Hi Chris,

I am totally willing to try this way, but I am not sure exactly where your code goes. Does it go under expression?  If so what property do I choose?
0
 
Butterfly2Author Commented:
never mind i see where to put the code
0
 
Christopher GordonSenior Developer AnalystCommented:
The code behind can be accessed by clicking the "Edit Script..." button.  

You'll need to pass your "source file name" and "destination directory" variables to the code behind by setting them in the "ReadOnlyVariables" property on that same page.

Once your on that code behind, I usually create global properties for these variables like this (example assumes variables are called myDestinationDirectory and myActiveFileName):

public string DestinationDirectory
{
            get
            {
                return Dts.Variables["myDestinationDirectory"].Value.ToString();
            }
}

Open in new window


and

public string ActiveFileName
{
            get
            {
                return Dts.Variables["myActiveFileName"].Value.ToString();
            }
}

Open in new window


Then you can just refer to these variables to make your code look a bit cleaner.

So moving forward, the entry point to the SSIS code behind is a void called Main().  Here we can call something similar to the function I posted earlier.

public void Main()
{
   string yourDateSuffix = "";  // replace with your suffix logic
   string newFileName = Path.GetFileName(ActiveFileName) + yourDateSuffix;
   MoveFile(ActiveFileName, DestinationDirectory, newFileName);
}

Open in new window


From this point we can leverage System.IO to do the work for us in a function like this:

private static bool MoveAndOverWrite(string sSource, string sDestnDir, string newFileName)
        {
            try
            {  
                string sDestn = sDestnDir + "\\" + newFileName;

                if (System.IO.File.Exists(sSource) == true)
                {

                    System.IO.File.Copy(sSource, sDestn, true);

                    System.IO.File.Delete(sSource);

                    return true;                   
                }
                else
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Specifed file does not exist");

                    return true;
                }
            }
            catch (System.IO.FileNotFoundException exFile)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("File Not Found " + exFile.Message);

                return false;
            }
            catch (System.IO.DirectoryNotFoundException exDir)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Directory Not Found " + exDir.Message);

                return false;
            }

            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);

                return false;
            }
        }

Open in new window


Note: The code above probably has some syntax issues.  I wrote a lot of it in the browser window.  It should give you an idea as to how to accomplish this though.  If this looks like too much of a pain in the ass, no worries there may be an easier way to do it.  Good Luck.
0

Featured Post

Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

  • 3
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now