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move win 2000 filesrvr to 08

Posted on 2014-10-14
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Last Modified: 2015-06-23
I have a file server that resides on Windows 2000.  I'd like to move it to a 2008 R2 machine without losing permissions.  I'm currently using Active Directory and Exchange 2010.  Is this difficult to do?

Here is the list from our network admin of what he believes we have to do:

•         Migrate shares over from drive letter host to drive letter destination server
•         Migrate shares by exporting registry key with shares
•         Maintain NTFS permissions
•         Rename old file server to hostnameold.local and rename hostname.local on the new server (we have various applications that are hardcoded by hostname) need to retain file server name
•         File server is only file server (so no need for AD, DNS, Print Server or other roles)
•         Data that we need to copy over is roughly 135.5 GB
•         Approximate 130 shares thru lanmanserver/shares registry check

Thanks!
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Question by:gebigler
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Expert Comment

by:Ben Hart
ID: 40380506
IMHO you're easiest bet is to use the File Server Migration Toolkit as seen here: http://blogs.technet.com/b/filecab/archive/2009/06/30/microsoft-file-server-migration-toolkit-1-2-available-as-a-free-download.aspx

It will simplify the actual copying of the data as well as keeping the NTFS and share permissions in addition to other benefits.

With regards to what your admin said the steps are.. I've never had to export/import registry settings for shared folders.  Even if the users must not see any difference or interruption in service.

If you manually recreated the shares themselves on the destination server you could still get away with using Robocopy to move the data while keeping the NTFS/Share perms.
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Mohammed Khawaja earned 500 total points
ID: 40380546
Another option would be to use ROBOCOPY to copy the files from one server to another.  Robocopy not only copies the permissions, but it can also restart from where it left off and also perform copy on only incremental changes.  It is a free product from Microsoft and is included in Win2K8 or higher.
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Author Comment

by:gebigler
ID: 40380807
He tried the file migration toolkit, but didn't have success.  I'm going to join him in his next attempt.  

As for robocopy, I read that by default it gives permission only to the directory level - not file level.  But by using various switches you can still accomplish it at the file level.  
> ROBOCOPY /Mir <Source> <Target>
> ROBOCOPY /E /Copy:S /IS /IT <Source> <Target>

I'll play around with both tools and let you know the results!  Thanks.
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Expert Comment

by:Ben Hart
ID: 40380822
I'd be interested to know what failed in the Migration Toolkit because I've been looking to use it.
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Author Comment

by:gebigler
ID: 40380868
I'll let you know!
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Author Comment

by:gebigler
ID: 40398024
These are the commands we used with robocopy and it worked!  I'll see if I can get info on what failed with the migration toolkit.  

First initial copy pass:                                      
robocopy \\source_server\source_folder D:\target_folder /e /zb /r:5  /w:10 /copyall /log:D:\initial_copy.log

Final incremental (mirror) pass:                
robocopy \\source_server\D$\source_folder D:\target_folder /e /zb /mir /log:D:\mirror_copy.log
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by:Seth Simmons
ID: 40846345
I've requested that this question be closed as follows:

Accepted answer: 500 points for Ben Hart's comment #a40380506

for the following reason:

This question has been classified as abandoned and is closed as part of the Cleanup Program. See the recommendation for more details.
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