Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 168
  • Last Modified:

Another Related Rate question

A particle p moves on the curve y = x pow(2) + 1 in such a way that dx / dt = 4.  If s is the distance of P from the point ( 0, 6 ), find ds / dt :  ( a ) in general as a function of x and ( b ) when P is at ( 2, 5).

Please explain how to get started with this problem.  

This is University calculus I  related rate problem.
0
naseeam
Asked:
naseeam
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
4 Solutions
 
phoffricCommented:
To get started with this problem, draw a line from a point (x,y) on the curve to (0,6). Then, s = f(x,y), and you are given that y = g(x).
0
 
naseeamAuthor Commented:
What do they mean by particle p moves on the curve y = x pow(2) + 1 in such a way that dx / dt = 4?
0
 
ozoCommented:
Solving
dx / dt = 4
we get
x = 4t +C
Given that, can you find y(t)?
0
Independent Software Vendors: We Want Your Opinion

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
phoffricCommented:
>> What do they mean by particle p moves on the curve y = x^2 + 1 in such a way that dx / dt = 4?
You have a parabola and a particle is moving on it in such a way that its speed in the x-direction is always 4 length-units/second.
0
 
naseeamAuthor Commented:
dx / dt = 4
 we get
 x = 4t +C
 Given that, can you find y(t)?

I believe this is integration.  Students haven't learned integration in this class yet.
0
 
phoffricCommented:
You don't need integration to compute the derivative ds/dt.

I already mentioned that you can determine s = f(x,y).
And you know that the particle p moves on the curve y = x^2 + 1
So, y = g(x).

So, implicitly, s = h(x), right?
And dx/dt = 4 from your OP.

So, now you can take derivative of s --> ds/dt using what rule?
0
 
ozoCommented:
If you have x(t) and y(x), can you get y(t)?
From y(t) and x(t) can you get s(t)?
0
 
naseeamAuthor Commented:
Great answers!  Not too much help, not too little help.  Perfect balance!
0

Featured Post

Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now