HTTP servers, Jetty servers, and API managers

I have seen documentation that states that some API managers will  successfully enforce rate limiting on HTTP transports, but not Jetty transports, due to a limitation of the jetty transport.  

This does not make sense to me as I thought Jetty was simply a HTTP server written in Java

What is the limitation in the Jetty transport that will not allow API managers to perform rate limiting?
Anthony LuciaAsked:
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dpearsonCommented:
Can you point to the documentation saying this?
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Anthony LuciaAuthor Commented:
This site:

http://www.mulesoft.org/documentation/display/current/Applying+Runtime+Policies

states:

Note that all the policy templates below are intended only for HTTP/HTTPS endpoints. If your API uses a Jetty inbound endpoint, all policies below will function as expected except for the rate-limiting and throttling policies. These policies will not work due to a limitation of the Jetty transport. If your API requires rate-limiting or throttling, please ensure that its inbound endpoint uses the HTTP transport protocol.

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dpearsonCommented:
You're right that Jetty is generally just a normal HTTP server.

But it looks like the issue is that mule is using an alternative protocol when you use this "Jetty transport":
http://www.mulesoft.org/documentation-3.2/display/MULE2USER/Jetty+Transport

See how the protocol in the request is set to "jetty://" instead of "http:'//"

So I think it's using their own, custom protocol to send the requests to the jetty server - not using regular http.
And presumably because of that, the rate limiting fails to work.

Seems like a pretty weird design choice - I suppose they must get a substantial performance benefit out of doing this.

Doug
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