How do I view the code execution path in visual studio debugger (Maybe the stack trace)

Hello, I am tracing through a huge C# code file using the VIsual Studio 2010 debugger. The file has huge methods and many "if then" statements.
Is their a way to view a list of the line numbers of the code that has been previously executed up to the point where my trace point is in the compiler? I need to know how to do that.
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brgdotnetcontractorAsked:
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Fernando SotoRetiredCommented:
Hi brgdotnet;

Using InteliTrace, "starting with Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate" please see this link Debugging Applications with IntelliTrace.

You can also use the Call Stack which will also give the information, How to: Use the Call Stack Window.
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Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)PresidentCommented:
Visual Studio Ultimate is expensive, and the Call Stack list the method calls, not the individual lines.

The easiest way I know of with one of the regular versions of Visual Studio is to put pertinent Debug.WriteLine calls in your code. These instructions send the information you pass as a parameter to the Output window. You can leave them in your code, by default they have no impact on the release version.

Could be as simple as:

Debug.WriteLine("Start");
// Code, one or more line depending on the granularity you need.
Debug.WriteLine("1a");
// Code
Debug.WriteLine("1b");
// Code
Debug.WriteLine("2");
// Code
Debug.WriteLine("3a");
// Code
Debug.WriteLine("3b");
// Code
Debug.WriteLine("End of operations");

You can also use the Debug.Indent() method to minimally format the output.
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brgdotnetcontractorAuthor Commented:
Thanks Guys. Just thought I would ask Jacques, isn't Debug.Writeline only used for Console applications?
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Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)PresidentCommented:
No, you can use it with almost any type of project. For most of them, the result goes to the Output window, that is available by default in the lower right corner of the VS screen. You can activate it through the Debug menu if it is not there.
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