Linux Drive Letter

My server running Centos 5.1 software RAID 10 got its one hard drive failed (sdd). It was hot swappable so that was replaced with a new drive.
Linux has now assigned a new drive letter to it sde instead of sdd. I don't want to reboot.

Is it possible to fix this?

Also what if I continue with sde and make partitions, add to RAID etc. Would the drive letter be changed whenever the machine is rebooted in the future?
sysautomationAsked:
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StampelCommented:
I would continue with sde.
Depending of what you do (like insert external USB sometimes) a drive could change from sda to sdb.
Verify your /etc/fstab file, it is probably using disk UUID or Volume Groups and not mention your drive letter.
If it doesnt mention it directly, you are good to go with it.
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Wilder_AdminCommented:
Rules are stored in /etc/udev/rules.d directory. Device letters depends on sequence of detecting hardware, it is dynamic. Even if name choosed by kernel can be changed it is not advised. But you can create additional symlink to device if you like.

A reboot should help to get the sdd back. The important is the UUID and not the name. If the raid is healthy then you can reboot without any doubt.
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sysautomationAuthor Commented:
Thanks.  Reboot got sdd back
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ExpertNotReallyCommented:
To prevent any type of mount fails I'd suggest you use UUID instead of the name.
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