SQL Server Best Practice

We are preparing to implement a Microsoft SQL Server to host Databases for different applications. I am concerned about conflict/contention/bottlenecks with multiple UserDBs and the TempDB. Does it matter if we put all Databases on the same instance or would we be better served to use separate instances therefore utilizing separate TempDBs?
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DKHeneryAsked:
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PatHartmanCommented:
Typically, test and production instances are separate for safety.  You want production to be as insulated from testing as possible.
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ZberteocCommented:
It depends on what you need those instances for but as Paul said, if you plan to put production and test/dev environments on teh same server then I recommend against it.

In regards to tempdb itself it is better to setup any instance to have tempdb files on separate drives than the regular databases, if possible. Also you want to create or move them on a different drive then C, which is default. Tempdb could grow to sizes that will surpass a typical C drive. Ideally you would want to separate your mdb,ndb,ndx(data) files and ldf(log) files on different drives as well, temdb and regular dbs, if possible.
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DKHeneryAuthor Commented:
Thank you for the input... I do understand the importance of moving the tempDB from the default location. My real concern is, I have 2 applications that run nightly ETLs which rely heavily on the TempDB during their processes. Would the best practice then be to run 2 Instances of SQL so they are not both hitting the same TempDB?
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