How do you measure SLA of systems?

I have a tool that logs and reports on system up time via pings , but i'm looking for something to log and manage my SLA of systems. What do you suggest? Some examples are below.

1) A print job SLA is 10 seconds to print per page, but now it is taking an average of 15 seconds.
2) An e-mail SLA from inbound to desktop is 5 seconds to hit the filters, make it through the email servers, and to the users desktop. Now it is taking 20 seconds.
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
SLA stands for service level agreement which normally only covers availability.

1) A print job SLA is 10 seconds to print per page, but now it is taking an average of 15 seconds.
Then you are not in compliance with your SLA and have to investigate why.  a print job is not something that is easily repeatable in the field as there are too many variables in play.. length of job, print queue depth, network congestion, printers internal queue depth.

2) An e-mail SLA from inbound to desktop is 5 seconds to hit the filters, make it through the email servers, and to the users desktop. Now it is taking 20 seconds.

Same problem with repeatability. and too many factors in play here. Email is problematic since part of the equation is totally outside of your control.. the message can be sent but either not accepted temporarily by the receiver and also depends upon their workload
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DavidSenior Oracle Database AdministratorCommented:
I concur with David.  Think of a SLA as a contract between the service provider and the recipient, whether it simply defines reasonable expectations, or is the basis on which payments are made.  

The customer, for example, agrees to pay the provider some amount when the database scheduled downtime is less than four months per month -- but a lessor amount if that service level is missed.  Or, a systems administrator has to respond to an after-hours page within thirty minutes.  These and other examples are specific, measurable, reportable metrics.

Hope that helps.
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