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RAM required for SQL 2008 on Windows server 2008 R2

Posted on 2014-10-24
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Last Modified: 2014-11-04
We are planning to install SQL 2008 on a new Windows Server 2008 R2. this is going to be our production database server. Currently we are planning to have a RAM of 4 GB. If we have the option, is it a good idea to increase the RAM? Will it make any difference if SQL is the only thing running on that Server?
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Question by:Angel02
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lcohan earned 250 total points
ID: 40402461
Of sourse it will make a huge difference! From my experience I found that people always underdimession the RAM on SQL Servers and expect fast queries - that will never hapen so please add as much RAM as you can (afford) and make sure to set the MAX SQL memeory to not starve your system.

http://www.brentozar.com/archive/2014/05/much-memory-sql-server-need/
http://sqlperformance.com/2013/10/sql-memory/how-much-ram
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by:Aneesh Retnakaran
ID: 40402470
depends how busy the application ./ database is.  I would definitely go for at least 8 / 16 GB, although I have seen SQL Servers running on 2005/ 2008 with 1GB and 2gb of ram
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by:Scott Pletcher
Scott Pletcher earned 250 total points
ID: 40402506
Given that:
1) the overall cheapest way to improve performance in SQL Server is more RAM;
2) even cheap home PCs routinely have 16GB+ now
4GB is ridiculously low.

Use at least 16GB, and 32GB is strongly preferred.  The money for that will cost far less than trying to tune it to run in only 4GB.
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Author Comment

by:Angel02
ID: 40402995
Thank you for the responses. I will ask for as much RAM as we can afford.

I am now thinking if I should go for Microsoft SQL Server 2012. I can't remember why I picked SQL 2008. I should mention the Windows server is 32-bit for few other reasons. Do you recommend SQL Server 2012?
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by:Scott Pletcher
ID: 40403044
At this point, you should go with SQL 2014.

But definitely 64-bit.  If you main Windows O/S is only 32-bit, you many not be able to run some of the more recent versions of SQL.
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by:Pramod Ubhe
ID: 40403831
from a vendor support perspective you should always go for latest version/service pack.
for RAM, 4 GB is too low but a database administrator should be consulted who is aware of what kind of database/s will be hosted on that server and based on the load or his analysis he will recommend the RAM. I have some DB servers with 8GB RAM running perfectly fine and some 256GB RAM DB servers which always alert for memory. there is also a setting in SQL to limit RAM utilization by SQL to a certain amount of RAM.
so my recommendation is to get in touch with your database administrator for this.
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by:warsawtech
ID: 40403857
I wish I could add to this, but confused by how the server is 2008R2 is 32 bit Angel02??
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by:David Johnson, CD, MVP
ID: 40404712
What is the compelling reason for 32bit server.. that is something that is getting harder and harder to find these days. 32bit server stop at Server 2008R2
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Author Comment

by:Angel02
ID: 40421611
It's actually Window Server 2008, my bad.
There is a DBASE program that the SQL Server accesses and the connections do not work on 64-bit. We have tried everything. Our only option at least for the next few months is to go 32-bit.

Thanks all!
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