Windows 2012 server...Dell...how big should the 1st partition be? Server is file and print sharing only

Hello,
Have a Dell R730 server. Came with Raid 5, 3 TB to make 2TB. The server is asking how big the boot partition should be. Dell recommends 60 gigs. Is 60 gigs enough? Eventually, would like to add SQL to this server. I was thinking of a 120GB boot but was not sure. Let me know what you recommend. In the past using Windows 2003 (old!) servers, the boot was 120GB but on some Windows 2012 servers the boot from Dell was 40gb. I know it easy to expand Windows 2012 but I want to get it right the first time.
Thanks
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dronethoughtAsked:
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Is 60 gigs enough?  <-- NO

For normal non-use and Windows Updates and stuff you would want to allow 200 GB. With SQL, consider at least 300 GB.  

I have an older Server 2008 where the OS is on 100 GB or more and it is running out of space. Windows Update, Symantec logs and so on. We can manage it, but we are going to make it larger (250GB).  

Do not make it too small.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
File servers make horrible SQL servers. So don't do that. And it is relevant to the specific question on partition size. For a file server, 60GB should be sufficient when all shares are on a separate data partition. In my consulting practice, I've standardized all of our deployments as virtual and configuration specifications. Boot VHDs for file servers are 50GB and hundreds of deployment across 2008 R2, 2012, and 2012 R2, I've never had a need to expand one. A benefit of virtualizing is that expanding a VHD can be easier than expanding a physical partition where partition boundaries may bump up against one another on a physical disk (or disks in an array.) So I have a safety net. But have never had to use it.
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Seth SimmonsSr. Systems AdministratorCommented:
agree...60gb is fine for a boot partition
sql installation only takes a few gb and your databases and transaction logs should be on separate spindles anyway
many of our windows virtual machines are 40gb or 50gb and work fine; those with larger memory footprint have the page file on a separate virtual disk
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dronethoughtAuthor Commented:
Wow!!! Thank you!!
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
@dronethought  - Thank you. I know you can use less disk than I suggested, but in my small clients where we are not always around, more disk has meant fewer issues for us. Cheers!
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dronethoughtAuthor Commented:
Agreed, John. 😀
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