#Error Conversions

Experts,

I have an access query that we use for inspections and the value is a string. My problem lies is that 90% of the time my field data are numbers and I convert them to a double in another query column so we can perform calculations to that field i.e. CDbl[Result1]. My problem is I have it as a string because my customers require me to occasionally type "Pass" or "Fail" due to the fact that they are visual inspections and do not have a calculated result. So in my converted column I get the #Error for all the places it has a "Pass" or "Fail" results. Is there where away to create another column maybe using the IIf statement to convert the #Error back to the "Pass" or "Fail"? I tried this but the computer won't recognize the #Error as a value.

Actual 1: IIf([Convert 1]=#Error,[Result1],[Convert 1])

Any help is greatly appreciated.
NuclearOilAsked:
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PatHartmanCommented:
How would pass or fail be "counted" in the calculation?

I would probably go with two columns.  One for the value and one for the grade.  You can calculate the grade based on the value so grade can be required.  Value seems to need to be optional.

You can't check for #Error, you would need to prevent it by testing for a not numeric value prior to doing the calculation.

IIf(IsNumeric(SomeField), ...calc here..., SomeField) As Result

The expression above will result in a string so again, you will have trouble down the line if you need to sum or create an average.  Just go with two columns and stop the confusion.
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Phillip BurtonDirector, Practice Manager and Computing ConsultantCommented:
Try:

Actual 1: IIf(iserror([Convert 1]),[Result1],[Convert 1])
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NuclearOilAuthor Commented:
Pat,

I would like to go with two columns but I have too much data stored that way. The way it was set up, pre dates me. Is there a way to convert the "#Error" to just appear as nulls?
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NuclearOilAuthor Commented:
Phillip,

Still comes up as #Error.
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Phillip BurtonDirector, Practice Manager and Computing ConsultantCommented:
Then try:

IIf([Convert 1]="#Error",[Result1],[Convert 1])
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NuclearOilAuthor Commented:
Pat,

The is numeric function will get me buy for what i need to do.

Thank you!
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