Determine Systeminfo in Linux

In windows:
 Systeminfo /s <ipaddress of the remote computer>

will display information about Windows system.
have read on how to do it in Linux, I found that : nmap -O command will do the same.

I am trying it on Centos, but does not work:
nmap
jskfanAsked:
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slubekConnect With a Mentor Commented:
@Shiju Jacob: jskfan asked about remote OS fingerprinting. Your commands give an information about local system. nmap -O is the proper tool in Linux.
It only has to be installed as it is not part of default CentOS installation.
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slubekCommented:
You don't have nmap installed
Do:
# yum install nmap

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Shiju JacobConnect With a Mentor Info SecurityCommented:
But nmap will only show the port related info

you can use couple of commands
cat /proc/cpuinfo
cat /proc/meminfo
cat /proc/version
cat /etc/*release*
uname -a
lspci
lsusb
 lsblk
dmidecode | less
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
Apparently the OS I installed does not know the command.
I have download and installed :CentOS-7.0-1406-x86_64-Everything.iso
I cannot install nmap.
yum
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slubekCommented:
"Could not resolve host: ..." means that you have issues with your internet connection.
What is the output of:
/sbin/ifconfig
cat /etc/resolv.conf
ping www.google.com

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jskfanAuthor Commented:
resolv.conf is empty
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slubekCommented:
That's why your system cannot resolve host names.
Put:
nameserver 8.8.8.8

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into resolv.conf

That will add Google nameserver.
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
I have added this to resolv.conf, but still cannot get to internet
nameserver 8.8.8.8
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slubekCommented:
Do you have an active internet connection?
What is the result of
ping -n 8.8.8.8

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Does it return responses like:
$ ping -n 8.8.8.8
PING 8.8.8.8 (8.8.8.8) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_req=1 ttl=43 time=58.1 ms
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_req=2 ttl=43 time=64.8 ms
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_req=3 ttl=43 time=2328 ms
...

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?
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
it shows "Network is Unreachable"
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slubekCommented:
So you have to configure network first. After all, you can't determine remote computer OS without being connected. :^)
Here you can find instructions.
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
Oh yes.. I have internet connection on my PC, Linux is on Vnware workstation
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
I tried on VM Settings:
host only, NAT, Bridge
still does not work
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slubekCommented:
Sorry, I know nothing about VMware configuration, you'll have to ask another expert how to set it up.

Anyway, when you have connection, install nmap and nmap -O will work.
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
I wonder  if  a moderator can jump in and adds  this Question to VMware area.
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
I downloaded  CentOS-7.0-1406-x86_64-GnomeLive.iso
 It worked just perfect..
 Thanks

cat /etc/*release* , retrieved the OS version of local system.
I do not have remote Linux box now to test the : nmap -O
it should work though

Thank you again
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
Thank you Guys!
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