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Detect last object clicked (on Access 2007 form) in BeforeUpdate event procedure

Posted on 2014-10-29
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Last Modified: 2014-10-29
In an Access 2007 form BeforeUpdate event procedure, is there any way of finding out the last object clicked on?  (The form's ActiveControl property doesn't do it, because BeforeUpdate fires before the object clicked on becomes active.)

In particular: on a form with a subform, clicking on the subform area triggers the main form BeforeUpdate event.  In the BeforeUpdate event procedure, I would like to know whether the subform was the last thing clicked on, so that I can tailor my mainform validation accordingly.
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Question by:MatthewNicoll
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 500 total points
ID: 40411650
Not unless you store this sort of data somewhere. If you truly must do that, then you can create a Form-level varialbe and use code like this in the OnExit event of each control:

sLastControl = Me.Name

Assuming the Form-Level variable is named "sLastControl", of course.

That said: You refer to "Mainform Validation", but you'd not be able to do that from the Subform, since by the time you hit the Subform the data in the Mainform has already been saved - so there'd be no need to validate, since you really couldn't do much about it.

In most common scenarios, you'd validate the Parent record BEFORE you add or modify a CHILD record. This is the reasoning behind the event sequence in Access.

However, if you could explain further about why you need to hold off on validating a Parent until the user has interacted with the Child, we might be able to dig a little deeper.
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by:MatthewNicoll
ID: 40411777
Thanks Scott.  I just wanted to make sure there wasn't some Form property I had missed.
Basically, I wanted to let the user fill in main and sub form information in any order before doing validation, if possible.
(... and without unbinding all the controls!)
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LVL 84
ID: 40412031
You can validate at any point, but if you do it AFTER you update the data, then there's really not much you can do about it - unless, of course, you're storing old values somewhere, and can "revert" them. Still, if you need that sort of control you're often better off using temporary tables, or moving to an unbound form.
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