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constructor not working

Im quite new to c# and working on my first project.

What Im trying to do is create a mass of objects in my case a load of directories, eventually I want to process the files in the directory, but at the moment concentrating on getting the framework working.

So what I have so far is:-
    class directory
    {
        public directory(String directory, ref worker worker)
        {
            if (worker.canIrun())
            {
                worker.runNew("x:\newDirectory");
            }
        }
    }

    class worker
    {
        public worker(String directory)
        {
            this.runNew(directory);
        }
        public void runNew(String directory)
        {
            directory newDirectory = new directory(directory, this);
        }
        public Boolean canIrun()
        {
            return true;
        }
    }

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So to call this in my main program, I want to be able to run something like:-
worker newWorker = new worker("c:\\firstDirectory\\);

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However I keep getting advised that my constructor doesnt accept my parameters.

What am I doing wrong????
0
tonelm54
Asked:
tonelm54
1 Solution
 
Peter HutchisonSenior Network Systems SpecialistCommented:
The problem is this line:

 directory newDirectory = new directory(directory, this);

You have a parameter called directory, a variable type called directory and a method called directory. A bit of a mess really.
Try changing the names.
0
 
Chris StanyonCommented:
Your directory ctor takes the worker argument by ref, so you need to pass it in by ref:

directory newDirectory = new directory(directory, ref this);

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As well as what Peter's advised I would suggest you look into creating your own coding standards. This will dictate things such as how you name your classes and members. For example, a common standard is to name your classes and members using PascalCase and then name your variables using camelCase. This is the format that Microsoft use, so you'll have some consistency between your own classes and the rest of the NET framework. It also makes reading your code easier - you'll quickly be able to identify what is a type or class member and what is a variable. Something simple like this can make a lot of difference:

class Directory
{
	public Directory(String directory, ref Worker worker)
	{
		if (worker.CanIRun())
		{
			worker.RunNew(@"x:\newDirectory");
		}
	}
}

class Worker
{
	public Worker(String directory)
	{
		this.RunNew(directory);
	}
	
	public void RunNew(String directory)
	{
		Directory newDirectory = new Directory(directory, ref this);
	}
	public Boolean CanIRun()
	{
		return true;
	}
}

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0
 
anarki_jimbelCommented:
Just to add about coding standards. In a team it's very important. Please see MS notes:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/ms229043(v=vs.100).aspx
0

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