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AIX Password

Posted on 2014-10-31
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Last Modified: 2014-11-07
I need to set password complexities on my existing AIX users. If I go into a specific user and edit their password settings does that apply to the next time they change the password or does it check the existing password against the new settings?

Also is there a local default policy that can be set?

Thank you

Ron
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Question by:agcsupport
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by:woolmilkporc
ID: 40416271
Existing passwords are not checked, the new policy will take effect at the next password change.

Defaults are in /etc/security/user under the "default:" stanza.
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by:woolmilkporc
ID: 40419580
"user" is a file under /etc/security and "default:" is the header of a stanza (a chapter, a paragraph, a subsection, whatever you'd like to call it) inside that file.

And case matters in Unix and thus also in AIX, it's "user" not "User".
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by:agcsupport
ID: 40419630
So do I simply edit the default settings in the user file? Once that's done any new user will inherit these settings?
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by:woolmilkporc
ID: 40419681
Yep!

And entries in the user's own stanza (under a header like e. g. "root:") override the respective defaults.
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by:agcsupport
ID: 40420374
Can I copy users file out, edit it then copy back to aix and be ok? Do I need to restart anything for AIX to see the changes?
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woolmilkporc earned 500 total points
ID: 40420398
Copying the file to and fro is basically no problem. Nothing needs to be restarted.

You should be aware, however, that UNIX/AIX use just a linefeed character (LF, 0x0A) to signify "newline", whereas Windows/DOS use carriage return plus linefeed for that purpose (CRLF, 0x0D0A).

So when copying between UNIX/AIX and Windows take care to instruct your file transfer program to leave the "newline" representation intact in the final outcome  (and  other character representations as well, of course).

When using FTP, for example, choose the "ASCII" (or "Text") transfer methode in both (!) directions. FTP will change LF to CRLF when transferring from UNIX to Windows and will change it back from CRLF to just LF when transferring back from Windows to UNIX.
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by:gheist
ID: 40423993
You have to learn to edit files with VI as this is only thing available in maintenance mode.
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by:agcsupport
ID: 40429333
Thank you for your help.
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