AIX Password

I need to set password complexities on my existing AIX users. If I go into a specific user and edit their password settings does that apply to the next time they change the password or does it check the existing password against the new settings?

Also is there a local default policy that can be set?

Thank you

Ron
agcsupportAsked:
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woolmilkporcCommented:
Existing passwords are not checked, the new policy will take effect at the next password change.

Defaults are in /etc/security/user under the "default:" stanza.
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woolmilkporcCommented:
"user" is a file under /etc/security and "default:" is the header of a stanza (a chapter, a paragraph, a subsection, whatever you'd like to call it) inside that file.

And case matters in Unix and thus also in AIX, it's "user" not "User".
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agcsupportAuthor Commented:
So do I simply edit the default settings in the user file? Once that's done any new user will inherit these settings?
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woolmilkporcCommented:
Yep!

And entries in the user's own stanza (under a header like e. g. "root:") override the respective defaults.
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agcsupportAuthor Commented:
Can I copy users file out, edit it then copy back to aix and be ok? Do I need to restart anything for AIX to see the changes?
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woolmilkporcCommented:
Copying the file to and fro is basically no problem. Nothing needs to be restarted.

You should be aware, however, that UNIX/AIX use just a linefeed character (LF, 0x0A) to signify "newline", whereas Windows/DOS use carriage return plus linefeed for that purpose (CRLF, 0x0D0A).

So when copying between UNIX/AIX and Windows take care to instruct your file transfer program to leave the "newline" representation intact in the final outcome  (and  other character representations as well, of course).

When using FTP, for example, choose the "ASCII" (or "Text") transfer methode in both (!) directions. FTP will change LF to CRLF when transferring from UNIX to Windows and will change it back from CRLF to just LF when transferring back from Windows to UNIX.
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gheistCommented:
You have to learn to edit files with VI as this is only thing available in maintenance mode.
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agcsupportAuthor Commented:
Thank you for your help.
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