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SCCM 2012 Install Reboots

We are currently deploying our updates and install to our Windows 7/8 workstations via MS SCCM 2012. It has been a recent trend where users are unexpectedly being prompted to restart their machine in the middle of the day (way after the scheduled deployment) without any suppress button.

We are looking for a method to ensure with 100% certainty that users machine's do not attempt to install\reboot 2-3 hrs after the initial deployment.

Any suggestions?
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GR JN
Asked:
GR JN
1 Solution
 
VB ITSSpecialist ConsultantCommented:
We are currently deploying our updates and install to our Windows 7/8 workstations via MS SCCM 2012. It has been a recent trend where users are unexpectedly being prompted to restart their machine in the middle of the day (way after the scheduled deployment) without any suppress button.
Firstly, are you deploying Windows Updates via SCCM or software updates?
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Brad BouchardInformation Systems Security OfficerCommented:
You simply set the options in the Software Updates section to not reboot; it really is that simple.  That being said, I've also ran into this and I had to dig through logs to determine what was either preventing it from happening, or overriding some setting I had.  

What I recommend is easy and will help ensure you don't have users who are being forced to reboot during production hours:

1)  Install the SCCM toolkit that comes with the SCCM console install.
2)  One of the tools installed with the above mentioned toolkit is CMTrace, and it is one of the best all around log readers/tools I've used.  
3)  Next, get the CCM logs from one of the computers in question that has rebooted unexpectedly, or out-of-band as we call it.  Usually located on the root of the C drive at C:\Windows\CCM\Logs.
5)  Locate the UpdateDeployment log and open it in CMTrace.  Look for any red or yellow values stating errors or warnings; if you don't find anything from here, look for informational items stating when the reboot happened.  If this log doesn't show the reboot, look through your other log files until you find the one that does.  I can't remember which log file shows the reboot from updates right off the top of my head, but it's either this one (mentioned at the beginning of this step) or one of the WU logs.

This is also a good reference to help.

That should get you at least on the right path.
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