• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 279
  • Last Modified:

Basic Network terminology (IP addresses)

I am trying to find out what the term or name is of a network that has a subnet mask of, where there are only 254 possible ip addresses in the range (this would be in a small office environment).  I thought it was called a class D network, but that is incorrect I think after reading some about it.  Likewise, what is the term or name of a network with a subnet mask of for the third and fourth octet would have variable ip addresses?  This obviously would be for a larger segmented network.

I thought they were called the following, but I don't think that is the case:

Class A network =
Class B network =
Class C network =
Class D network =  (I don't think these are correct terms).

I need to take a basic networking class to understand this better, but if there are basic terms for I could at least sound a little more intelligent when speaking to our network admins.

1 Solution
Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
You're close.

Class A -
Class B -
Class C -

Class D addresses are reserved for multicasts.

Now some people will get their boxers in a bunch because addresses haven't been allocated by class in years. But that's totally irrelevant since we're not talking about getting addresses from ARIN or ISP's. If you tell a network person that you're using class C addresses in your branch office, they'll know what you're saying.  And that's all that matters.
jbobstAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the explanation Don.  Just what I was looking for!
Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
To add to that, there are Private (Non-routable) IP address blocks intended for use by LANs (Local Area Networks).  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_network  and http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc958825.aspx  Then there is this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Link-local_address which Microsoft calls "Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA)".
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

Get your problem seen by more experts

Be seen. Boost your question’s priority for more expert views and faster solutions

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now