Basic Network terminology (IP addresses)

I am trying to find out what the term or name is of a network that has a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, where there are only 254 possible ip addresses in the range (this would be in a small office environment).  I thought it was called a class D network, but that is incorrect I think after reading some about it.  Likewise, what is the term or name of a network with a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0 for the third and fourth octet would have variable ip addresses?  This obviously would be for a larger segmented network.

I thought they were called the following, but I don't think that is the case:

Class A network = 0.0.0.0
Class B network = 255.0.0.0
Class C network = 255.255.0.0
Class D network = 255.255.255.0  (I don't think these are correct terms).

I need to take a basic networking class to understand this better, but if there are basic terms for I could at least sound a little more intelligent when speaking to our network admins.

Thanks!
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jbobstAsked:
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
You're close.

Class A - 255.0.0.0
Class B - 255.255.0.0
Class C - 255.255.255.0

Class D addresses are reserved for multicasts.

Now some people will get their boxers in a bunch because addresses haven't been allocated by class in years. But that's totally irrelevant since we're not talking about getting addresses from ARIN or ISP's. If you tell a network person that you're using class C addresses in your branch office, they'll know what you're saying.  And that's all that matters.
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jbobstAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the explanation Don.  Just what I was looking for!
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
To add to that, there are Private (Non-routable) IP address blocks intended for use by LANs (Local Area Networks).  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_network  and http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc958825.aspx  Then there is this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Link-local_address which Microsoft calls "Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA)".
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