reservation

I have purchased an HP laser jet printer and am going to network it.  I have gone into DHCP on my win 2008 r2 server and am at the point where I am gong to setup a reservation.  I know the mac address  of the printer because I powered it on and printed the config.  I have not networked the printer yet of course.  If I specify an ip address of whatever and type in the mac address how does the printer know to use this address?  If I put in the software install cd and plug the printer into the network, will it go out and grab an ip address or will the DHCP server see that it is online and automatically give it the ip that I have requested that it obtain?

What if I have already setup a network printer and DHCP has given it an ip address.  Can I still give it a reservation after it has already received an ip address?  Will it grab the new one that I have given it after the printer is turned off and back on?
mkramer777Asked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

surduffyCommented:
Ok to answer your questions: How does the printer know to use this address, its actually how does the server know how to give this address to the printer and the answer is because you gave the mac address so the server looks at the device asking for an ip and then looks at there is a reservation for that mac address if so here you go ip x.x.x.x have a nice day.

What I do most times is connect the printer to the network.  Get the ip address it is given, go to a web browser connect to the ip address of the printer and change it to the static (manual) ip I want it to use.  Then on the dhcp side I just put a fake mac address so that the ip is not in the pool of available ip addresses to give out and you are done.
0
mkramer777Author Commented:
If you put a static ip address using the web browser why would you have to go to the DHCP side of things and reserve it there?  Is that so you won't run into IP conflicts?
0
Asif BacchusI.T. ConsultantCommented:
I generally proceed as follows:

1)   Connect the printer and allow it get whatever IP it wants.
2)   Connect to the printer, change the hostname to meet my requirements, ensure DHCP is enabled, confirm MAC address.
3)   Create a reservation for the printer in DHCP on the server using the correct MAC address and desired hostname.  That address will now be removed from the address pool and will read as 'inactive'.  At this point, 2 IPs are available for the printer but the reservation is 'inactive' so no conflicts.
4)   Power-cycle the printer so it grabs the reserved IP and releases the old automatically assigned one.
5)   Assuming all is successful, you know the MAC address is correct and the reservation now reads 'active'.

I do it this way mainly because it keeps things actually DYNAMIC (i.e. DHCP) and if I need to change the printer IP in the future, all I have to do is make the change on the server and the printer will get it automatically.  I do not have to go back into the printer settings at all, because it is still DHCP.

Hope that helps.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Windows Server 2008

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.