T-SQL – Real of Decimal datatype?

Dear experts,

I have an SQL 2008R2 database with a filed in it which is now Money datatype. But it look I’ll need to store more than 4 digits and as you know it is limit to for example 0.2345, but now I should be able to write a value like 0.234567 (up to 10 digit depends of customer precision selected).

So my question is – what data type I should select in SQL ? Decimal or real or float? This table is expected to have milions of records in few years and will be heavy used.

This amount will be used for :
1) A lot of Sum over it
 2)Delete other Money value to this value and then and then multiple by this value – 10 times rather than 1)

I think for now to use Decimal – like (12,9)
dvplayltdAsked:
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Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
>I should be able to write a value like 0.234567 (up to 10 digit depends of customer precision selected).
numeric(11, 10) if we're talking only a single number left of the decimal, and up to 10 digits after.
The 11 can go as high as 38 total digits.

decimal and numeric are functionally the same

float and real are approximate data types, and I haven't had experience with this but it would scare most uses away from it.
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dvplayltdAuthor Commented:
To Jim,

Thanks for your time. The value may be 99.23456 that is why 12,9.

So you tell me to use numeric(12,9) instead decimal(12,9) ? This is different types ?
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Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
Functionally they're the same animal.  Not sure why they both exist though, my guess would be backwards compatibility.
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HuaMin ChenProblem resolverCommented:
Hi,
You can have more decimal precision by using the data type like
decimal(23,7)
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dvplayltdAuthor Commented:
10x
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Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
Thanks for the grade.  Good luck with your project.  -Jim
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Microsoft SQL Server 2008

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