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outlook 2013 ms access

I was using the following code within MS Access 2003 (XP) to pipe contact data into Outlook.  Worked great with Outlook 2003 and Outlook XP. It does not work with Outlook 2013.  Is there an easy fix for this, or is it more involved?

Code:
==================================
 Set OlkApp = New Outlook.Application
   With OlkApp
      Set olkCon = .CreateItem(Outlook.OlItemType.olContactItem)
      With olkCon

.BusinessTelephoneNumber = strBusinessTelephonenumber
.HomeTelephonenumber = strHomeTelephonenumber
.MobileTelephoneNumber = strMobileTelephonenumber
.BusinessFaxNumber = strBusinessFaxNumber
.Email1Address = strEmail1Address
.JobTitle = strJobTitle
.CompanyName = strCompanyName
.FirstName = strFirstname
.LastName = strLastname
.BusinessAddressStreet = strBusinessAddressStreet
.BusinessAddressCity = strBusinessAddressCity
.BusinessAddressState = strBusinessAddressState
.BusinessAddressPostalCode = strBusinessAddressPostalCode

                Forms![Main F]![MainSub].Form![Command178].SetFocus
                Forms![Main F]![MainSub].Form![Contacts_Corr_Pick].Visible = False
                DoCmd.Requery



         olkCon.Save
      End With
   End With
   
   ' Clean up.
   Set OlkApp = Nothing
   Set olkCon = Nothing
=============================================

Fails here:  "   Set OlkApp = New Outlook.Application"
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hgj1357
Asked:
hgj1357
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1 Solution
 
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
Are you sure Outlook is installed on the machine? If I'm not mistaken, I believe Outlook 2013/O365 can be entirely hosted "in the cloud", which would mean nothing is installed on the local machine.
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
A little more detail on what doesn't work would be helpful.

But the short answer is no, it should be workable.

Jim.
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hgj1357Author Commented:
Think so. i have an Outlook.exe in the "C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office 15\root\office15" folder and I have OST files in the \..\Local Settings\application data\microsoft\Outlook folder
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hgj1357Author Commented:
BTW. I'm still using Access 2003 NOT 2013
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hgj1357Author Commented:
I get the following error show in attachment 001.  002 shows my current references.
001.jpg
002.jpg
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
Your using early binding and specifying Outlook XP.  You need to update the reference or switch to late binding.

Jim.
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hgj1357Author Commented:
I don't know what late binding is. How would I update the reference?
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
Late binding looks like this:

Dim objOL as Object
Set objOL = CreateObject("Outlook.Application")

Rather than:

Set objOL = New Outlook.Application

You use the generic "object" designation when defining everything.  What it is then is not determined until runtime rather than design time.   In doing so, you don't tie yourself to a specific lib (version) of Outlook.   However, there are a few downsides:

1. About a 15% performance penalty

2. You don't get intellisense when developing.

3. You can't use pre-defined constants, such as olFolderContacts.

To get around some of that, many developers will do early binding during development, then switch to late binding for deployment.  You need to be careful when doing that however by always using the old version you plan to target for during development.

 For example, you would not want to set a reference to Outlook 2013, and possibly use a new feature from that, then deploy to someone who would have Outlook 2002.  Your code might break.   Your generally OK though going the other direction.

Jim.
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hgj1357Author Commented:
"Set objOL = CreateObject("Outlook.Application")"

I get the same error. Can't create object.
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hgj1357Author Commented:
Do I have the correct references?  I attached a few posts ago.
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
Then as Scott indicated in his first post, Outlook must not be installed locally at all.

When you late bind, a reference is not required.   It relies upon the registry to start up the last registered version of an application.  Since your getting an error when you go to do that, then Outlook is not installed.

Jim.
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hgj1357Author Commented:
This is what I launch to start outlook  "C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office 15\root\office15\OUTLOOK.EXE"  it IS installed locally.
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hgj1357Author Commented:
Do I have this entered correctly?

    Dim OlkApp As Object
    Dim olkCon As Object
   
   Set OlkApp = CreateObject("Outlook.Application")
   With OlkApp
      Set olkCon = .CreateItem(Outlook.OlItemType.olContactItem)
      With olkCon

.BusinessTelephoneNumber = strBusinessTelephonenumber
etc etc
.BusinessAddressPostalCode = strBusinessAddressPostalCode

         olkCon.Save
      End With
   End With
   
   ' Clean up.
   Set OlkApp = Nothing
   Set olkCon = Nothing
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
It is correct except for:

   Set olkCon = .CreateItem(Outlook.OlItemType.olContactItem)

You can't use any constants in the obj lib at design time because with late binding, references are not known/checked until run-time.  All the constant values can be found here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/aa219371%28v=office.11%29.aspx

olContactItem has a value of 2, so:

   Set olkCon = .CreateItem(2)

Right now, you'll get a compile error.  

Make sure you've unchecked that outlook reference, do a compile, and make sure you have no errors.   If you still get a can't create active-x object, then something on the machine is messed up.

Jim.
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hgj1357Author Commented:
OK.

The original code posted in the OP works 100%.

The problem was that I had:

MS Outlook 11.0 Object Library  when I actually needed:
MS Outlook 15.0 Object Library

Simple fix and it works like a charm.

Thanks
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hgj1357Author Commented:
I've requested that this question be closed as follows:

Accepted answer: 0 points for hgj1357's comment #a40435008

for the following reason:

The problem was not he code but the reference.
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
Also note that by doing that, your code will now only work when Outlook 2013 is installed and no where else.

Your better off with late binding.

Jim.
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hgj1357Author Commented:
I posted 5-6 references that I was using. You did state how to update my reference or what to update to. At least I didn't understand that's what you were getting at. I had no idea that "MS Outlook 11.0 Object Library" meant Outlook XP or that "MS Outlook 15.0 Object Library" exist.

The problem may be that I am too ignorant to understand some of what is posted here, that appears perfectly obvious to others.
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
Sorry, I missed the second part of your following comment, instead I focused on late binding, which is the way to go.

When you use a reference, you tie yourself to a very specific type lib.   Now that you've set that reference, while you code works (and I never said it was wrong), you app will no longer work with someone that has Outlook XP.

The only way to support both versions is:

1. Use late binding
2. Target your development for the oldest version.

 Which I mentioned in follow on comments.

Jim.
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hgj1357Author Commented:
That's ok. I have an office of around 20. When we drop Outlook 2013 to go for something else, I will update everyone at the same time. The code runs slick as snot.
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
<<...slick as snot. >>

 and here I thought I was the only one that used that saying (I've gotten some odd looks)<g>.

Jim.
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