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TFS newbie basic question

Posted on 2014-11-13
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Last Modified: 2014-11-13
To use TFS in its most basic way as a developer, not admin, is this all I need to know:
Step #1 Start work: Get Latest Version
Step #2 No need to Check-Out , as check out auto when edit.
Local save as normal
Step #3 finish work, check in

would that be enough for me to join a team as a newbie, and be able to start work?
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Question by:Silas2
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by:käµfm³d 👽
ID: 40440788
Depends on the team, I would say. At my old job, we were new to TFS, and the above was all we did. We only ever had one branch of code. At my current job, we have multiple branches, so I now have to know about branching and merging.

Shelving is useful for saving your changes without committing them to the branch.

For your #2, I wouldn't say that is always the case. Sometimes you may have files that aren't really editable, but for which you still need to check out and modify. As an example, one of my projects has a specification document checked into TFS. We publish this spec document along with the website. I have Microsoft Word on my machine, but I cannot guarantee that everyone does--since Word costs money. So whereas I edit my spec document in Word, when I publish the document I publish it as PDF, because Adobe Reader is free, and I can be reasonably assured that most anyone can read a PDF. So whenever I need to update the PDF, I still have to check it out in order to be able to save the updated Word document to the updated PDF>

If your team uses a build server, then you may want to gain a basic understanding of what it provides for you.
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by:Silas2
ID: 40440815
Do you use the work item stuff?

And all the exclude/include, I don't really have any idea what the real-life scenario where you would want that?
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käµfm³d   👽 earned 2000 total points
ID: 40440862
Yes. We run an Agile shop, so we incorporate the Work Item and Bug tasks into our development cycle.

And all the exclude/include
Are you referring to this:

Screenshot
If so, then all that means is what are you either going to commit (Included) or not commit (excluded) to the server for the check-in that you are about to perform. I myself do this when I am debugging. We usually have a base web.config/app.config that is checked into TFS. During debugging, I might change the values in the web.config to something other than the base, but I may not want to commit such changes to the server. I will exclude my modified web.config from being checked in.
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by:Silas2
ID: 40440900
Oh I see, that makes sense. Thanks.
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