SyBase SQL Query

Hello Experts,

I have a unique situation where I need to group by a column but the column has the data stored in a way where I cant figure out how to group by. The DB table in question contains employees and which store they have access to (S1 = Store1, S2 = Store 2, S17 = Store17, etc). I want to see all employees grouped by stores they have access to. As an example, employee "KRISHNA C." would have be apart of stores: 1, 4, 5, 6, AND 7. (see attached)

This is SyBase SQL Anywhere v10
table.png
triphenAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

Dany BalianCTOCommented:
this is how you want to see them? or this is the main table??
0
triphenAuthor Commented:
This is the main table.....

I want to see (as a crude example)


S1
KRISHNA C.
ELNA
JUNE

S4
KRISHNA C.

S5
KRISHNA C.

S6
KRISHNA C.

S7
KRISHNA C.
0
wilcoxonCommented:
The main table contains the stores as a single combined string?  That does make it hard.

If there are a reasonably small number of different stores, you could do something like:
select 'S1' store, name from main_table where stores like '%,S1,%'
union all
select 'S2' store, name from main_table where stores like '%,S2,%'
-- etc

Open in new window

0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
Cloud Class® Course: Certified Penetration Testing

This CPTE Certified Penetration Testing Engineer course covers everything you need to know about becoming a Certified Penetration Testing Engineer. Career Path: Professional roles include Ethical Hackers, Security Consultants, System Administrators, and Chief Security Officers.

triphenAuthor Commented:
The main table contains the stores as a single combined string?  That does make it hard.


Yes Exactly!

This worked, but I imagine there has to be a better way. Currently there are 20 stores, but there will be more. Any other ideas?
0
wilcoxonCommented:
I don't have a better idea in pure sql.  Personally, I'd write a perl script to process this data and generate the output you want (any language with decent string handling should work).

This should work except for the $connect_string and real table name:
use strict;
use warnings;
use DBI;
my $dbh = DBI->connect($connect_string) or die $DBI::errstr;
my $sth = $dbh->prepare("select name, stores from main_table");
$sth->execute;
my %stores;
while (my $row = $sth->fetchrow_arrayref) {
    foreach my $store (split /,/, $row->[1]) {
        next if ($store =~ /^\s*$/);
        $stores{$store} = [] unless $stores{$store};
        push @{$stores{$store}}, $name;
    }
}
$sth->finish;
foreach my $store (sort keys %stores) {
    print $store, ":\n", join("\n", @{$stores{$store}}), "\n\n";
}

Open in new window

0
triphenAuthor Commented:
I dont know perl.

I know VB.net is VS2010...any ideas with that?
0
wilcoxonCommented:
It's been something like 15 years since I coded in VB (pre-.Net).  I've thought about learning C# but haven't gotten around to it yet...
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Query Syntax

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.