Passing classes to methods

Hello,
I have a WCF application which has a TransactionServices.cs . In here I create and instance of a User class called MyUser and an instance of an Environment class called MyEnvironment.  I have another class definition called Commands.cs in which I have defined various commands. These commands will require access to MyUser & MyEnvironment so I have created methods within Commands.cs to receive both of these classes from TransactionServices.cs

TransactionServices.cs
                MyCommands = new Commands();
                MyCommands.ReceiveMyUser(MyUser);
                MyCommands.ReceiveMyEnvironment(MyEnvironment);
                MyCommands.MyCommands("TESTCMD1");

Commands.cs
         public void ReceiveMyUser(UserMaster MyUser)
        {
        }
        public void ReceiveMyEnvironment(Environment MyEnvironment)
        {
        }

When ReceiveMyUser(UserMaster MyUser) is envoked from TransactionServices.cs I can see that MyUser is passed. However when ReceiveMyEnvironment(Environment MyEnvironment) is envoked, MyEnvironment is passed but MyUser is Null. When I call TESTCMD1 after these 2 receive methods , both MyUser & MyEnvironment are null. Why are these objects set to null each time I call MyCommands ?  Is there a better way of doing this ?

regards
Pat
LVL 1
pclarke7Asked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

it_saigeDeveloperCommented:
Can you provide the code for Commands.cs and TransactionServices.cs.  Also how do you instantiate Commands.cs???

-saige-
0
louisfrCommented:
What do the ReceiveMyUser and ReceiveMyEnvironment methods do? Your sample seems to imply they don't do anything. Do you expect their parameters to be stored somewhere?
From your description, they should be properties.
public UserMaster MyUser { get; set; }
public Environment MyEnvironment { get; set; }

Open in new window

0
pclarke7Author Commented:
Thanks to both of you for your comments,
Louis, you were correct. The problem was that I was not assigning the values. I mistakenly believed that because I passed in the same name that it would be automatically assigned

Commands.cs
         public void ReceiveMyUser(UserMaster MyUser)
        {
        }
        public void ReceiveMyEnvironment(Environment MyEnvironment)
        {
        }

When I changed it to the following, it worked

Commands.cs
         public void ReceiveMyUser(UserMaster PassedMyUser)
        {
            MyUser=PassedMyUser;
        }
        public void ReceiveMyEnvironment(Environment PassedMyEnvironment)
        {
          MyEnvironment=PassedMyEnvironment;
        }

It does seem a little odd that I have to receive in the object under a different name (PassedMyUser) just so I can assign it to the original name (MyUser).

Pat
0
it_saigeDeveloperCommented:
You don't have to use a different name, you just have to identify which MyUser you are referring to since there are two, one defined in the class and the other defined by the method.  This is usually accomplished by specifying *this* to represent the class defined variable, e.g. -
public void ReceivedMyUser(UserMaster MyUser)
{
	this.MyUser = MyUser;
}

Open in new window


-saige-
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
pclarke7Author Commented:
Thanks for your help
Pat
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
C#

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.

Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.