how to convert from std::string to char

How could I take a std::string containing a number like "65" and want to convert that into a char value, in this case 'A'?
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rustycpAsked:
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rustycpAuthor Commented:
This is what I did but if there's a cleaner better way I'd still like to know:

string str = "123";
char v = (char)(boost::lexical_cast<int>(str));
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jkrCommented:
The simplest way would be a 'stringstream', e.g. like

#include <string>
#include <sstream>
using namespace std;

//...

int n;
char c;
string str = "123";
stringstream ss(str);

n << ss;

c = (char)n;

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Using the operators '>>' and '<<', you can pretty much convert anything to other types using stringstreams, given that these overators were overloaded for the respective types.
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phoffricCommented:
Usually you need to include a catch of boost::bad_lexical_cast .
You are making assumptions about the size of the integer value represented by the string. What if it is a larger than a char? Do you care?

In case you want to use other conversion functions such as atoi, then std::string::c_str() is used to return a const pointer to the c-style string.
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phoffricCommented:
Under the hood in the streams used to convert strings to int is a memory allocation, which is why this approach, while providing safety, is slower than other approaches.

BTW, should it be
ss >> n;
?

Take away safety aspects, and you can even use sprintf, atoi, strtol.
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sarabandeCommented:
Take away safety aspects, and you can even use sprintf, atoi, strtol.
atoi and strtol are safe. atoi never fails but will stop at the first non-digit. strtol also doesn't fail but tells where it stopped conversion, what allows to detect wrong input. sprintf(s, "%d", intvar); is not safe cause the format string "%d" could be changed to "%s" what could be used to produce a buffer overflow if an attacker also changed the value of 'intvar' to a valid pointer value. however, the attacker must use a debugger (or similar) to do so.

in c++ string streams as suggested by jkr are the preferred way (when using the correction 's >> n;' as told by phoffric). the string stream operator>> is also safe regardless of the contents cause it will fail if the string value is not numeric or beyond integer size but would not throw an exception. also the cast to char is safe as it can handle all possible int values even if they are beyond char size. but of course values greater than 127 or negative integer values less than -128 would be wrong.

Sara
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