Solved

New windows 2012 r2 domain controller settings

Posted on 2014-11-20
5
363 Views
Last Modified: 2014-11-20
I am setting up a new domain controller in an office.

Can somebody please confirm the correct settings. I believe it is the following.

For server:

192.168.0.25
255.255.255.0
192.168.0.1

primary dns: 192.168.0.25
secondary dns: 192.168.0.1

work stations:

192.168.0.X
255.255.255.0
192.168.0.1

primary dns: 192.168.0.25
secondary dns: 192.168.0.1

DHCP is setup on router no the windows 2012 server - that how I want it.

Are these setting correct? Please assist
0
Comment
Question by:Ikky786
5 Comments
 
LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:Acosta Technology Services
ID: 40455052
Those settings are technically sound; are you having issues using that network configuration?
0
 

Author Comment

by:Ikky786
ID: 40455086
im actually replacing a windows 2003 server. The previous IT guy had these settings:

server:

server ip: 10.0.0.1
subnet: 255.0.0.0
default gateway: 10.0.0.2
primary dns : 10.0.0.2
secondary dns: 8.8.8.8

workstation:

ip: 10.0.0.14
subnet: 255.0.0.0
default gateway: 10.0.0.2
DNS servers: 10.0.0.1
Primary WINS server: 10.0.0.2

DHCP is setup on the router- so the workstation receive network settings dynamically. The funny thing is WINS is not installed on the windows 2003 server so why is the ipconfig /all on the workstation showing Primary WINS server as being 10.0.0.2.  The funny thing is these settings are working, but how? Are they correct?
0
 
LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:Acosta Technology Services
ID: 40455104
If the settings you just posted are working, then the network configuration you're looking to move towards will not work without making changes on the rest of the environment.  A couple things to keep in mind:

192.168.x.x will not work if the gateway is still 10.0.0.2, are you planning on changing the gateway to a 192.168.0.x address as well?

If WINS is not in use then there shouldn't be any issue removing it from the settings.

The environment is currently a /8, that seems a bit extreme for a single office.  If you stay with the 10.x.x.x subnet I would recommend subnetting further, going with a /16 (10.0.x.x) or even a /24 if you can get away with 254 IPs.  

Is the current 2003 server a domain controller as well?  You'll want to ensure you cleanly move roles (if they exist) to the new server and make necessary changes to AD sites and services if the IP schema changes to 192.x.x.x.
0
 
LVL 3

Accepted Solution

by:
Barry Molenwijk earned 500 total points
ID: 40455131
If you're replacing a server and the router is handling DHCP, you should use an IP range which is acceptable for that Router.

In your case, your router decides which subnetrange you can work with. Apparently that's 10.0.0.0 with a subnet of 255.0.0.0. You can't just use a whole different IP range like 192.168.0.0 - .255.

Let's say the default dateway (router) is 10.0.0.2, then check if 10.0.0.3 is available and use that for your server IP. Also, the secondary DNS server of 8.8.8.8 is a public DNS server. Your primary DNS server for your worksations is your Windows Server 2003 machine, so you probably want to make sure your new server also hosts DNS. Your primary DNS for your server is your Router, so you should stick to that.

What I'd suggest in this case is the following:

Server IP: 10.0.0.3 <= You'd better make a reservation for this on your router so it doesn't hand this IP to other machines
Server Subnet: 255.0.0.0
Default Gateway: 10.0.0.2
Primary DNS: 10.0.0.2
Secondary DNS: 8.8.8.8

Workstation IP: 10.0.0.whatever as long as it doesn't conflict with your servers.
Workstation Subnet: 255.0.0.0
Default Gateway: 10.0.0.2
Primary DNS: 10.0.0.3 <= Or whichever IP your new server gets
Secondary DNS: 8.8.8.8

Overall though, using 10.0.0.0 with a subnet of 255.0.0.0 is poor network planning. If your company grows really large, it can cause tremendous latency due to the number of broadcasts you get during the day.
But if you decide to change your IP range, remember that your router is leading. You should verify this with the person that manages your router.
0
 
LVL 27

Expert Comment

by:masnrock
ID: 40456483
Unless 192.168.0.1 is a device that can handle DNS, there should be no mention of it anywhere.

Also, a domain controller sometimes runs into issues when a second DNS server is at play. Get rid of the second entry.

Is the router configured for your proposed subnet?
0

Featured Post

Manage your data center from practically anywhere

The KN8164V features HD resolution of 1920 x 1200, FIPS 140-2 with level 1 security standards and virtual media transmissions at twice the speed. Built for reliability, the KN series provides local console and remote over IP access, ensuring 24/7 availability to all servers.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Join Greg Farro and Ethan Banks from Packet Pushers (http://packetpushers.net/podcast/podcasts/pq-show-93-smart-network-monitoring-paessler-sponsored/) and Greg Ross from Paessler (https://www.paessler.com/prtg) for a discussion about smart network …
An article on effective troubleshooting
In this video, we discuss why the need for additional vertical screen space has become more important in recent years, namely, due to the transition in the marketplace of 4x3 computer screens to 16x9 and 16x10 screens (so-called widescreen format). …
With the advent of Windows 10, Microsoft is pushing a Get Windows 10 icon into the notification area (system tray) of qualifying computers. There are many reasons for wanting to remove this icon. This two-part Experts Exchange video Micro Tutorial s…

685 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question