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What's Wrong with My Access 2013 Web App Macro?

Posted on 2014-11-24
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Last Modified: 2014-11-24
I'm having trouble updating a text box that is formatted to accept a General Date in an Access 2013 Web App.  Here's what's supposed to happen.

1.  The user selects a term from the Term (Months) combo box.
2.  After the value in the combo box is updates (and assuming it is not empty), the macro is supposed to add the number of months selected in the combo box to the date/time value in the Effective Date field and enter the result of that calculation in the Expiration Date field.

Access is telling me that there's a problem with my DateAdd function in the macro however I see no problem with it.  Interestingly, Access stops telling me there's a problem if I remove the "=" sign from in front of the DateAdd function, however as you might expect that just causes the string "DateAdd(...)" to be placed in the Expiration Date field.

I'm attaching a couple of screenshots to help clarify this.

Any idea what I'm doing wrong here?
Thanks!
Capture-EffectiveDate.PNG
Capture-Term-AfterUpdateMacro.PNG
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Question by:penlandt
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penlandt earned 0 total points
ID: 40463340
Found my own answer.  Apparently the syntax for the web app version of the DateAdd function is different than the desktop version.  Rather than using the "m" argument to represent "month", the function Month should be used instead:

WRONG:
=DateAdd("m",1,[txtEffectiveDate])

RIGHT:
=DateAdd(Month,1,[txtEffecitveDate])
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by:penlandt
ID: 40463341
Found my own answer.
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