Avatar of rookie_b
rookie_b
Flag for United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland asked on

VMware ESXi 5.0 remove iscsi lun from datastore

Hello,

I have a datastore on ESXi 5.0 that consists of a 2.7TB  local disk and a 2TB  iscsi LUN. I want to remove the LUN. Is there a way to do that, or do I need to destroy the datastore and recreate it, this time assigning only the local disk?

What will happen if the LUN dies, or loses network connection?

At the moment I am considering adding a new datastore, shutting down the VMs and removing them from inventory, then moving their folders to the new datastore, and re-adding them to inventory.

I thought about using Veeam Backup to do migration, but it does not copy the snapshots and failed on machines that were not shut down.

Thanks!
VMwareStorageStorage Software

Avatar of undefined
Last Comment
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert PRO / EE Fellow/British Beekeeper)

8/22/2022 - Mon
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert PRO / EE Fellow/British Beekeeper)

I have a datastore on ESXi 5.0 that consists of a 2.7TB  local disk and a 2TB  iscsi LUN. I want to remove the LUN. Is there a way to do that, or do I need to destroy the datastore and recreate it, this time assigning only the local disk?

when you state 2.7TB local disk, do you mean a virtual machine with a 2.7TB virtual disk?

or the physical disk is 2.7TB, and the datastore is 2.7TB, and it has a 2TB virtual machine disk ?

the 2TB virtual disk is used as an iSCSI Server with 2TB LUN?

In removing a datastore, the first thing that should be done, is the contents removed.

and then the datastore unmounted from the ESXi server.
Hypercat (Deb)

I'm not sure what you mean by "removing" the LUN.  Generally speaking if you don't need to have the host machine connected to that device any more, you can simply delete it from the storage configuration on the ESXi host.  The question, though, is where your VMWare software, logs, etc., reside and where the VMs are stored. A LUN is basically just an iSCSI connection to a physical location on a file server/NAS. So, where is that and what is stored there?
rookie_b

ASKER
Hi,

Initially the datastore was 2.7TB, hosted on fixed local storage. THen we increased the size of the datastore by adding a 2TB iscsi lun from a NAS. Unfortunatelly, even though we haven't used the space - it is set to prefer the fixed storage, we cannot reverse it and reduce the size of the datastore. When I try detaching the iscsi target, it says it is being used in a datastore, so we cannot remove it.
Experts Exchange is like having an extremely knowledgeable team sitting and waiting for your call. Couldn't do my job half as well as I do without it!
James Murphy
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert PRO / EE Fellow/British Beekeeper)

I'm not sure, I'm following here...

you have extended a local datastore, by adding an iSCSI LUN to it, as an extent?

so you have two datastores, connected to the ESXi server?

one on local storage and one on iSCSI storage?

or do you just have one single datastore?

If you have added additional storage to a local datastore, you will have to destroy the entire datastore, you remove the iSCSI LUN.

Could you upload a screenshot of your datastores?
rookie_b

ASKER
I have a single datastore, which I increased by adding the iscsi. Now I realize it's a very bad practice, but I still need to deal with it. It looks like I will have to destroy it and rebuild it. I can move all the VMs, but there is a .locker folder with logs on it. That would probably prevent me from destroying the datastore, or will it?
ASKER CERTIFIED SOLUTION
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert PRO / EE Fellow/British Beekeeper)

Log in or sign up to see answer
Become an EE member today7-DAY FREE TRIAL
Members can start a 7-Day Free trial then enjoy unlimited access to the platform
Sign up - Free for 7 days
or
Learn why we charge membership fees
We get it - no one likes a content blocker. Take one extra minute and find out why we block content.
Not exactly the question you had in mind?
Sign up for an EE membership and get your own personalized solution. With an EE membership, you can ask unlimited troubleshooting, research, or opinion questions.
ask a question