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Fiber Patch Cabling Question

Posted on 2014-12-03
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Last Modified: 2014-12-18
Good Day,
     I currently have all my switches interconnected with the orange 62.5 fiber patch cables(3560G's).  We are moving to an additional suite, which just has just had a 50nm fiber run installed to connect to 2 closets.  I understand that I will need 50nm patch cables to connect the new fiber patch panels to the switch up-links to connect the 2 closets, but my question is Am I OK with maintaining the current orange 62.5 patch cables for the connections between all the other switches?  So essentially there will be 2 switches connected via 50nm, and the rest are 62.5?

Thank in advance.
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Question by:DaveIsHere08
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by:John-Charles-Herzberg
John-Charles-Herzberg earned 400 total points
ID: 40479112
In terms of physical properties, the difference between these two fiber types is the diameter of the core-the light-carrying region of the fiber-signified by the numeric nomenclature. In 62.5/125 fiber, for example, the core has a diameter of 62.5 microns and the cladding diameter is 125 microns.

Therefore, 50-micron multimode fiber offers nearly three times more bandwidth (500 MHz-km) than FDDI-grade 62.5-micron fiber (160 MHz-km) at 850 nm.
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by:DaveIsHere08
ID: 40479138
So I can still maintain all my current connections even if the one connection between the closets is 50nm and all the other connection between switches in each closet is 62.5?  So 1 switch in each closet will connect to the fiber patch panel with 50nm, then the other fiber connections on those switches that connect to the other switches in the closet will be 62.5
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by:John-Charles-Herzberg
ID: 40479473
However, the smaller core of 50-micron fiber can cause a reduction in power budget for LED-based applications. A lower power budget reduces the number of connections permitted in a link and can reduce the sup portable distance for power-limited ap plications like 10-Mbit/sec Ethernet (10Base-F) and Token Ring.
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Craig Beck earned 1600 total points
ID: 40479856
Simple answer... yes you'll be fine.

The existing fibre and links to existing switches will remain - you're just adding new runs to new locations/switches.
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