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Where do i find the wireless registry key?

Posted on 2014-12-03
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Last Modified: 2014-12-08
I need to change the wireless key on 200 laptops at our school. I would like to do this as painless as possible. The problem is that if I change the key then students cannot get logged in and thus cannot get a group policy so I need to change it using their current key but provision the new key somewhere in a GPO or registry send.
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Question by:mtchs
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by:Wylie Bayes
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I do not believe it is stored in the registry... rather here:  c:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Wlansvc\Profiles\Interfaces\[Interface Guid]\

The information is stored in .xml files, and keys converted to Base64 I think?  I suppose you could restore this from one machine to the next, however i have not tried it personally.
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by:Zsolt Pribusz
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Can you wireless network operate on another SSID too?
If yes, then setup a new SSID, and push out wireless config with GPO.
Wait about a week unti everybody gets the new config.
Remove old SSID from your network.
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by:rindi
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In an AD setup you should use an enterprise setup rather than a pre-shared key. Windows server has radius included so that should work. You would then use your standard domain account to logon to the wireless and wouldn't need a key..
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Craig Beck earned 500 total points
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Assuming this is W7, export the WLAN profile from one of your laptops using the following command...

netsh wlan export profile key=clear

Edit the .xml file that was just exported and change the key (just do a find/replace to replace the text between the <keyMaterial></keyMaterial> tags.  Save the file.

Import the file into a laptop to test the key has changed...

netsh wlan import filename="yourwlanprofile.xml"

Push the file via GPO script to your laptops.
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by:mtchs
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Thank you , that works great. We just have to get it into the laptops while they are still connected to the old Access Points.
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